Courses

Anthropology and Sociology of Religion

AASR 40203 Sociology of Religion
W 9:30-12:20 SS 404

Instructor: Jenny Trinitapoli

What is religion?  How can religion be studied sociologically?  How did religion’s significance change as the world enters the modern age?  What affect the different importance and position of religions in different societies?  How do we account for the growth and decline of religious groups?  What social factors and processes influence individuals’ religious beliefs, commitments, practices, conversions, and switching?  In what ways can religion impact economy, politics, gender and race relations in the modern times?  These are the core questions that this course intends to deal with.  The course is designed to cultivate in students an understanding of the distinctively sociological approach to studying religion, and familiarize students with the important theoretical approaches as well as major findings, problems and issues in the field.

Ident. SOCI 40203

AASR 42407 Comparative and Global Christianities
T 4:00-6:50 S201

Two questions drive this course: 1)  How do we understand the 'globalizing' grounds of various Christianities (e.g. mainline Protestantism, charismatic Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, biblical fundamentalism)?  2) What terms of difference (e.g. cultural, heretical, racial, sexual, geopolitical) result from these varying grounds?  Beware: this is not a world missiology class, but an anthropological examination of indigenous and missionary entanglements with colonial, national and transnational projects of expansive reform.  As such, we will read ethnographies and histories to follow Christian transformations and Christianities transformations worldwide with empirical weight on the contemporary.  

Ident. HCHR 42407

AASR 42514 Witchcraft
W 11:00-1:50 S201

This seminar examines a broad range of historical and anthropological approaches to understanding those practices often understood (perhaps problematically) under the cross-cultural category of "witchcraft." The geographic range of historical and ethnographic materials is broad and includes Africa, the Americas, East Asia, and Europe. We will particularly attend to the theoretical and methodological issues that the study of witchcraft has raised, and continues to raise, for anthropology and history.

Ident. HREL 42514/ANTH 42514

AASR 42808 Religion and the Cold War
W 4:00-6:50 S208

This seminar considers the religious legacies and exigencies of the Cold War as it played out in the U.S. and throughout the post-WWII order of nation-states and 'rogue states.'  Special attention will be paid to Asia, Eastern Europe, the Middle East as well as to post-1965 diasporic communities in the U.S.  Topics include the rise of anti-communism and anti-Americanism, relations between Islamism and communism, discourses and practices of religious freedom, atheism, liberation, reunification and millenarian salvation. 

Ident. RAME 42808

Bible

BIBL 31000 Introduction to the Hebrew Bible
T/TH 10:30-11:50 S106

Ident. NEHC 20504/30504/JWSC 20120/RLST 11004

BIBL 32602 Introduction to the New Testament
M/W 10:30-11:50 S106

This is an introductory course to the history and literature of the New Testament.  Our primary focus will be to read select texts of the New Testament, with an emphasis on their literary nature, their historical problems and sources, their theological visions, and their historical, geographic, social, religious, political, and cultural contexts in early Jewish and Greco-Roman worlds.  One will have the opportunity to situate one's questions about and approaches to these texts in light of the history of scholarly research and through critical reflection about the methods and goals of interpretation.

PQ:  Discussions groups will meet on Fridays, 12:00-1:00 in S200, S201, S208, S400.

Ident. RLST 12602

BIBL 34000 Introductory Biblical Hebrew 2
M/W/F 8:00-8:50 S201

Instructor: Liane Marquis

PQ: BIBL 33900

BIBL 35300 Introductory Koine Greek 2
M/W/F 8:00-8:50 S208

Instructor: Allison Gray

PQ:  BIBL 35100

BIBL 35615 History of the Greek Language
T/TH 1:30-2:50 Cl 21

Instructor: Sofia Torallas Tovar

Greek is one of the oldest continuously written languages: we have testimonies of it across three millennia. This course will review the various stages of this language from its first written texts (Mycenaean Greek) to Medieval and Modern Greek, including the Greek dialects, the rise of the Koiné, Biblical Greek, and the contact of Greek with other languages through history. We will read and discuss texts from all phases, including literary texts, epigraphy, papyri and medieval manuscripts. Two years previous study of Greek is a requirement for enrolment.

Ident. GREK 25615/35615

BIBL 45603 The Greek Magical Papyri
T/TH 9:00-10:20 S200

We will read a number of spells in Greek from the enigmatic corpus, which is known as the Papyri Graecae Magicae. We will focus particularly on the language of these documents, their descriptions of the praxis of magical rituals, and their valuable contributions to the religious historical perspectives. Where appropriate, we will draw attention to parallels with early Christian texts and ideas.

PQ:   at least three years of Greek

Ident GREK 23915/33915

BIBL 50902 The Book of Kings: Critical Review
F 10:00-12:50 S406

The first of a two-course sequence.   The course will review the entire book in Hebrew and introduce all critical problems and aspects.

PQ:   biblical Hebrew. biblical Greek; and at least one of: modern Hebrew, German, and French. Instructor pre-approval required.

The “Optional Reading Section”  will be held on W  9:30-10:30 in  Swift 403.

IDENT. NEHC 40902

BIBL 54100 Philo of Alexandria as a Jewish Historian
M 1:00-3:50 S403

Philo of Alexandria is without dispute one of the most important first century C.D. authors for helping modern exegetes contextualize the early Christian movement. While his voluminous work has many facets, we will focus in this course on the few writings where Philo acts as a historiographer and ethnographer (i.e., Against Flaccus, On the Embassy to Gaius, Every Good Man is Free, and On the Contemplative Life). By close readings from sections of these works, we will learn about Roman-Jewish interactions in troubled times and enigmatic Jewish groups like the Essenes and the Therapeutai.

PQ: Good knowledge of Greek.

Divinity School

DVSC 45100 Reading Course: Special Topic

PQ: Petition with bibliography signed by instructor; enter section number from faculty list

DVSC 49900 Exam Preparation

PQ: Open only to Ph.D. students in quarter of qualifying exams.  Department consent.  Petition signed by Advisor.

DVSC 50100 Research: Divinity

PQ:  Petition signed by instructor; enter section number from faculty list.

DVSC 59900 Thesis Work: Divinity

PQ: Petition signed by instructor; enter section number from faculty list.

History of Christianity

HCHR 32302 Byzantium: Art-Religion-Culture
T 1:30-4:20 S208

In this introductory seminar we will explore works of art and architecture as primary sources on Byzantine civilization. Through the close investigation of artifacts of different media and techniques, students will gain insight into the artistic production of the Byzantine Empire from its foundation in the 4th century A.D. to the Ottoman conquest in 1453. We will employ different methodological approaches and resources that are relevant for the fruitful investigation of artifacts in their respective cultural setting. In order to fully assess the pivotal importance of the visual arts in Byzantine culture, we will address a wide array of topics, including art and ritual, patronage, the interrelation of art and text, classical heritage, art and theology, Iconoclasm, etc.

Although conceived primarily as an interactive seminar, this course will include lecture sessions that are intended to contextualize the individual artifacts selected for discussion within their larger historical framework.

Ident. RLIT 32302/ ARTH 22302/32302 /RLST 28310

HCHR 34304 The Carolingian Renaissance
MWF 12:30-1:20 ARR

Instructor: Michael Allen

The Carolingian renaissance flowered thanks to the leadership of a new royal (AD 751) and then (from Christmas 800) imperial dynasty.  Expansive political and cultural initiatives reshaped Europe into a distinct space, not least, though paradoxically, through its fragmentation after AD 843.  We shall study the actors and trends at play, the important role of Classical models and Latin book culture, and consider the relevant sources in all their physical, textual and imaginative variety.

Ident. HIST 22115/32115/CLCV 22115/32115

HCHR 41604 The Cult of Relics in Byzantium and Beyond
TH 1:30-4:20 S208

The cult of relics played a vital role in Byzantine culture and, consequently, left a strong imprint on the artistic production.  Not only did the veneration of relics find expression in personal devotion, but the image of the Byzantine court was largely modelled on the claim that the emperors possessed the most precious of all sacred remains, first and foremost those associated with the Passion of Christ and the Virgin Mary.  The outstanding treasure of relics housed in the imperial palace significantly contributed to the understanding in the medieval Christian world of Constantinople as the “New Jerusalem”.

We will begin our investigation in the ancient Near East, where major centers of pilgrimage developed from the fourth century on.  These sites considerably fueled the early Byzantine cult of relics and the associated artistic production.  The chief focus of the seminar will be on the major urban centers of the Byzantine Empire.  Thessaloniki and especially the capital city of Constantinople.  We will closely study different types of reliquaries manufactured in the Byzantine Empire over the centuries and investigate how their design responded to devotional needs, ritual practice and political claims.  Historical developments and primary texts (in English translation) will be addressed throughout to better understand the circumstances of the acquisition of relics and the motivations guiding their veneration.

Last but not least, we will explore the enormous impact the Byzantine cult of relics had on the religious life and artistic production of the Catholic West, particularly after the looting of Constantinople by the Latin invaders during the 13th century.  We will explore the repercussions that the extensive transfer of relics from the Christian East had on the architecture of western churches, their liturgical stetting and

Ident. RLIT 41604/ARTH 41602

HCHR 42407 Comparative and Global Christianities
T 4:00-6:50 S201

Two questions drive this course: 1)  How do we understand the 'globalizing' grounds of various Christianities (e.g. mainline Protestantism, charismatic Catholicism, Eastern Orthodoxy, biblical fundamentalism)?  2) What terms of difference (e.g. cultural, heretical, racial, sexual, geopolitical) result from these varying grounds?  Beware: this is not a world missiology class, but an anthropological examination of indigenous and missionary entanglements with colonial, national and transnational projects of expansive reform.  As such, we will read ethnographies and histories to follow Christian transformations and Christianities transformations worldwide with empirical weight on the contemporary.  

Ident. AASR 42407

HCHR 42901 Christianity and Slavery in America, 1619-1865
T/TH 9:00-10:20 S201

This course examines the history of Christian thought and practice regarding slavery in the United States.  Particular attention is paid to Christian missions to slaves, debates about the abolition of slavery, the pro-slavery Christian defense, and the practice and evolution of slave religion.

Ident. RAME 42901

HCHR 43102 Early Modern Catholicism
M/W 10:30-11:50 S200

This survey course examines the history of Catholicism from the fourteenth through the sixteenth centuries.  The main focus will be on the latter.   The course will address the questions about the nature of reform, the issues of authority and ecclesiology, the rise of heresy, and the interest in spiritual exercises and mysticism.  Some of the authors and texts will include The Modern Devotion, Johann Tauler, John Huss, John Eck, Thomas More, Thomas Cajetan, Ignatius of Loyola, and Teresa of Avila.  We will examine the sixteenth-century Catholic responses to the writings of the Protestant reformers.  Close attention will be paid to the conciliar decisions of the Council of Constance, Lateran V, and the Council of Trent.  We will also focus on the different concerns of the Spanish Inquisition.

Ident. THEO 43102

HCHR 43301 Religion in Modern America, 1865-1920
T/TH 1:30-2:50 S200

This course is a general history of religion in the United States from the Civil War to the 1920s. Special emphases include religious practice, interreligious encounters and conflicts, race, confrontation with modernity, and the changing social and public dimensions of religion in the US.

Ident. RAME 43301

HCHR 43806 Readings in Luther
M 1:30-4:20 MMC Library

This class will read sources that illustrate the development of Luther’s thought as expressed in various genres.   We will study Luther’s disputations, polemical treatises, and his exegetical works.  We will look at both his main doctrinal themes as well as his underlying assumptions.  We will also try to understand the nature and purpose of sixteenth-century polemics.

Ident. THEO 43806 

HCHR 47006 Early Spain: Visigoths, Umayyads, and Asturians
T 9:00-11:50 S400

This course will examine the history of the Iberian peninsula from the fall of Rome to about 1100, paying particular attention to the religion and culture of the region, including the contest between Arian and Catholic Christianity, the rise of monasticism, the Muslim conquest, the Christian response, manuscript culture and religious architecture, and the place of minority groups living in Christian and Muslim Spain.

PQ:  Must be able to read fluently in one relevant language other than English (Spanish, Arabic, Latin, French etc.)

Ident. ISLM 47006/HIST 60608

History of Judaism

HIJD 35004 Readings in Ibn Tufayl’s Hayy b. Yaqzan
T 3:00-5:50 S403

Ident. ISLM 35004/NEHC 35004/RLST 25105/FNDL 25105

HIJD 44612 The Occult in the Islamic World
TH 11:00-1:50 S201

This course examines the development and reception of the occult sciences in the Islamic world, with primary attention to the Islamic tradition but also attending to Judaism and other traditions in conversation with it. Readings will include primary texts as well as secondary scholarship from history and anthropology.

Ident. HREL 44612/ISLM 44612

HIJD 45101 History and Memory in Jewish Thought
W 6:00-8:50 S201
HIJD 47200 Modern Jewish Intellectual History
TH 3:00-5:50 S403

History of Religions

HREL 36000 Second Year Sanskrit: Readings in the Mahabharata
T/TH 1:30-2:50 S403

PQ:  Exam at the end of the quarter.

Ident. SANS 20200/SALC 48400

HREL 42501 Many Ramayanas
M/W 1:30-2:50 S208

A close reading of the great Hindu Epic, the story of Rama’s recovery of his wife, Sita, from the demon Ravana on the island of Lanka, with special attention to changes in the telling of the story throughout Indian history, up to its present use as a political weapon against Muslims and a rallying point for Hindu fundamentalists.  Readings in Paula Richman, Many Ramayanas and Questioning Ramayanas; in translations of the Ramayanas of Valmiki, Kampan, Tulsi, and Michael Dutta, as well as the Ramjataka; Rama the Steadfast, trans. Brockington; the Yogavasistha-Maharamayana; and contemporary comic books and films.

PQ:  Essay at the end of the quarter

Ident. SALC 42501/SCTH 40701/FNDL 22911/RLST 26801

HREL 42514 Witchcraft
W 11:00-1:50 S201

This seminar examines a broad range of historical and anthropological approaches to understanding those practices often understood (perhaps problematically) under the cross-cultural category of "witchcraft." The geographic range of historical and ethnographic materials is broad and includes Africa, the Americas, East Asia, and Europe. We will particularly attend to the theoretical and methodological issues that the study of witchcraft has raised, and continues to raise, for anthropology and history.

Ident. AASR 42514/ANTH 42514

HREL 44400 Tibetan Auto/biography
T/R 10:30-11:50 ARR

In this course, we will explore the genres of biography and autobiography in Tibetan religious andliterary culture, with special emphasis on the latter. Though often considered a genrecharacteristic of-and exclusive to-Western modernity, autobiography has had a long and rich historyin Tibet, spanning at least a thousand years. We will begin the course by reading some theoreticalstudies of biography (including "hagiography") and autobiography. We will then consider some issuesspecific to Tibetan

auto/biography and its historical development. The remainder of the quarter will be spent in readingand analyzing representative examples of these genres, drawn from a variety of authors and periods.

PQ: Preferably some background in Tibetan or Buddhist studies.

Ident. RLIT 44400/SALC 49002

HREL 44612 The Occult in the Islamic World
TH 11:00-1:50 S201

This course examines the development and reception of the occult sciences in the Islamic world, with primary attention to the Islamic tradition but also attending to Judaism and other traditions in conversation with it. Readings will include primary texts as well as secondary scholarship from history and anthropology.

Ident. HIJD 44612/ISLM 44612

HREL 45716 Seminar: Ghosts, Demons, and Supernatural Danger in the Ancient World
W 1:30-4:20 ARR

This two-quarter graduate seminar, which fulfills the seminar requirement for graduate students in the Department of Classics’ Program in the Ancient Mediterranean World, will examine the ancient discourses on and the ritual remedies for supernatural danger in Persian, Greek, Norse, Roman and other cultures.  The first quarter will be devoted to guided reading and discussion while the second quarter will be reserved for writing a major research paper. Students, by arrangement with the instructor,  will also be permitted to enroll for just the first quarter  and write a shorter paper or take-home exam. 

Ident. CLAS 45716/ANC 45716

HREL 45800 Readings in Chinese Buddhist Texts
TH 12:30-3:20 ARR

This quarter we will focus on Buddhist texts from Dunhuang

PQ:  Reading ability in literary Chinese is a requirement

Ident. EALC 45800

HREL 47001 Pahlavi Language and Literature
ARR ARR

PQ: Interested student should contact the instructor regarding time/day.

HREL 48910 Readings in Tibetan Buddhist Texts
T/TH 3:00-4:20 S200

Readings in selected Buddhist doctrinal writings in Tibetan. 

PQ: Open to students reading Tibetan at the advanced level

Ident. DVPR 48910/SALC 48501 (3rd/4th year Tibetan)

HREL 50810 Indian Tantrisms
T/TH 1:30-2:50 S403

PQ: Background in the study of Indian religions

Ident. SALC 50802

HREL 53102 Recent Work on Self and Non-Self in Indian Philosophy
W 3:00-5:50 S403

Recent years have seen a considerable body of new scholarship devoted to the problem of personal identity and related topics in Indian and Buddhist philosophy, much of this work now informed by sustained engagement with the treatment of analogous problems in contemporary Anglo-American philosophy (Parfit et al).  The present seminar will take up a selection of recent contributions—by Ganeri, Siderits, and Sorabji, among others-considered in relation both to the Indian sources they interpret and the contemporary discussions that shape their interpretations.

PQ:  Indian Philosophy I and II or equivalent; or familiarity with recent treatments of Personal Identity in Anglo-American philosophy.

Ident. DVPR 53102/SALC  51000

Islamic Studies

ISLM 30200 Introductory Qur’anic Arabic II
T/TH 9:00-10:20 S208

Instructor: Jawad Anwar Qureshi

Ident. NELC 30200

ISLM 35004 Readings in Ibn Tufayl’s Hayy b. Yaqzan
T 3:00-5:50 S403

Ident. HIJD 35004/NEHC 35004/RLST 25105/FNDL 25105

ISLM 37301 Islam in Modern South Asia
M 3:30-6:20 ARR

Instructor: Francis Robinson

In the nineteenth and twentieth centuries Islam in South Asia came to embrace roughly one third of the Muslims of the world. It also moved from being primarily a receiver of Islamic influences from outside the subcontinent to increasingly being a transmitter of influences to the wider Muslim world. The beginning of the period saw great changes for Muslims as, after 600 years of wielding power, they became subject to British rule. In this context there was a ferment of new ideas as Muslims confronted the challenges of maintaining a Muslim society without power and in the face of the apparent triumph of Western civilisation. Out of the ferment came ideas and institutions which were to have great influence in South Asia, but also far beyond: the Islamic modernism of Sayyid Ahmad Khan, his Aligarh movement, and Muhammad Iqbal; the new forms of ‘willed’ Islam represented by Deoband, the Ahl-i Hadith and the Tablighi Jama<at; and the political Islam pioneered by Mawlana Mawdudi and his Jamati Islam. On the political side there was the development of Muslim separatism, eventually led by the remarkable Jinnah, and culminating in the partition of British India at independence. A growing issue from the 1920s was what should be the relationship between Islam and the modern state. Arguably Pakistan was to be the laboratory in which the problem was worked out. But it was no less a problem for Muslims in India and Bangladesh, and in all these states finding a solution has been subject to the play of politics, national and international.

Ident. SALC 37301/47301

ISLM 40100 Islamic Love Poetry
T 1:30-4:20 MMC Library

PQ:  Some facility in an Islamicate language (such as Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Urdu, Bengali, Malay, Punjabi, Hindi, Hebrew) or in a European non-English tradition)

Ident. RLIT 40300/CMLT 40100/NEHC 40600

ISLM 40450 Qur’an, Hadith and Khutba
TH 1:30-4:20

Ident. ARAB 40450

ISLM 44612 The Occult in the Islamic World
TH 11:00-1:50 S201

This course examines the development and reception of the occult sciences in the Islamic world, with primary attention to the Islamic tradition but also attending to Judaism and other traditions in conversation with it. Readings will include primary texts as well as secondary scholarship from history and anthropology.

Ident. HIJD 44612/HREL 44612

ISLM 47006 Early Spain: Visigoths, Umayyads, and Asturians
T 9:00-11:50 S400

This course will examine the history of the Iberian peninsula from the fall of Rome to about 1100, paying particular attention to the religion and culture of the region, including the contest between Arian and Catholic Christianity, the rise of monasticism, the Muslim conquest, the Christian response, manuscript culture and religious architecture, and the place of minority groups living in Christian and Muslim Spain.

PQ:  Must be able to read fluently in one relevant language other than English (Spanish, Arabic, Latin, French etc.)

Ident. HCHR 47006/HIST 60608

Ministry and Religious Leadership

CHRM 30600 Introduction to Ministry Studies: Colloquium
W 1:30-2:50 S400

This year-long integration seminar grounds first year M.Div. students in habits and perspectives essential to the practice of ministry. Students will cultivate the discipline of attention--learning to read closely, to listen deeply, to interrogate their experience, and to participate in rigorous critical conversation. During the first quarter, students will explore the relationship of narrative and theology; the second quarter will engage students in a close encounter with urban ministry; during the third quarter, students will integrate tradition, reason, and experience as they articulate definitions of ministry

PQ: First year M.DIV. students only.   DO NOT REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

CHRM 32500 Theology in the Public Square
T/TH 9:00-10:20 MMC Library

This course explores themes in “public theology” as formulated by Martin Luther King, Jr., Reinhold Niebuhr, Dorothy Day, Malcolm X, Thich Nhat Hanh, and Abraham Joshua Heschel, and in relation to selected contemporary cultural contexts.

CHRM 35200 Arts of Ministry: Pastoral Care and Counselling
F 9:00-11:50 S400

This course is the second of a three-quarter sequence introducing students to essential aspects of religious leadership; the sequence is required for second-year MDiv students and complements their field education experience. During this quarter students focus on religious communities' practices of healing, reconciling, and empowerment, investigating the broad scope of human experience using the lenses of theology, ethics and the social sciences, and cultivating practices of care such as attention, accompaniment, and moral guidance.

PQ:  Second year M.DIVs only; others by permission of instructor

CHRM 40700 Practice of Ministry II
M 3:00-4:50 S400

PQ: Second year M.DIV. students only.    DO NOT REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

CHRM 42800 Senior Ministry Thesis Seminar
W 3:00-5:50 S400

PQ:  Required seminar for M.DIV. students in the year in which they are writing and presenting their thesis.

Philosophy of Religions

DVPR 42806 Death: Some Aspects
TH 9:00-11:50 ARR

PQ: Consent of Instructors

Ident. PHIL 51650

DVPR 43800 Heidegger Through the Turn
M 1:30-4:20 S201
DVPR 48910 Readings in Tibetan Buddhist Texts
T/TH 3:00-4:20 S200

Readings in selected Buddhist doctrinal writings in Tibetan. 

PQ: Open to students reading Tibetan at the advanced level

Ident. HREL 48910/SALC 48501 (3rd/4th year Tibetan)

DVPR 51502 Readings in Tiantai Buddhism: The Doctrine of Ineradicable Evil in the Buddha-Nature, and The Shanjia/Shanwai Schism
M 3:00-5:50 S208
DVPR 53102 Recent Work on Self and Non-Self in Indian Philosophy
W 3:00-5:50 S403

Recent years have seen a considerable body of new scholarship devoted to the problem of personal identity and related topics in Indian and Buddhist philosophy, much of this work now informed by sustained engagement with the treatment of analogous problems in contemporary Anglo-American philosophy (Parfit et al).  The present seminar will take up a selection of recent contributions—by Ganeri, Siderits, and Sorabji, among others-considered in relation both to the Indian sources they interpret and the contemporary discussions that shape their interpretations.

PQ:  Indian Philosophy I and II or equivalent; or familiarity with recent treatments of Personal Identity in Anglo-American philosophy.

Ident. HREL 53102/SALC  51000

DVPR 58804 Seminar: Dissertation Methodology
ARR ARR

A two-week seminar on the methodology of advanced research and writing for Ph.D. students in the dissertation stage of their program.  Each student will present a selection from their current work, followed by a response from Prof. Marion and a discussion-format critique.  The presentations will be reserved primarily for students in ABD status.  Those not yet dissertating  but in the final stage of their qualifying exams and proposal submissions are encouraged to engage in the discussion portion of the seminar

The seminar will be scheduled over 2-3 hour sessions each week from February 8-19.    Enrollment limit:  12

Ident. THEO 58804

Religion, Literature, and Visual Culture

RLIT 32302 Byzantium: Art-Religion-Culture
T 1:30-4:20 S208

In this introductory seminar we will explore works of art and architecture as primary sources on Byzantine civilization. Through the close investigation of artifacts of different media and techniques, students will gain insight into the artistic production of the Byzantine Empire from its foundation in the 4th century A.D. to the Ottoman conquest in 1453. We will employ different methodological approaches and resources that are relevant for the fruitful investigation of artifacts in their respective cultural setting. In order to fully assess the pivotal importance of the visual arts in Byzantine culture, we will address a wide array of topics, including art and ritual, patronage, the interrelation of art and text, classical heritage, art and theology, Iconoclasm, etc.

Although conceived primarily as an interactive seminar, this course will include lecture sessions that are intended to contextualize the individual artifacts selected for discussion within their larger historical framework.

Ident. HCHR 32302/ ARTH 22302/32302 /RLST 28310

RLIT 40300 Islamic Love Poetry
T 1:30-4:20 MMC Library

PQ:  Some facility in an Islamicate language (such as Arabic, Persian, Turkish, Urdu, Bengali, Malay, Punjabi, Hindi, Hebrew) or in a European non-English tradition)

Ident. ISLM 40100/CMLT 40100/NEHC 40600

RLIT 41604 The Cult of Relics in Byzantium and Beyond
TH 1:30-4:20 S208

The cult of relics played a vital role in Byzantine culture and, consequently, left a strong imprint on the artistic production.  Not only did the veneration of relics find expression in personal devotion, but the image of the Byzantine court was largely modelled on the claim that the emperors possessed the most precious of all sacred remains, first and foremost those associated with the Passion of Christ and the Virgin Mary.  The outstanding treasure of relics housed in the imperial palace significantly contributed to the understanding in the medieval Christian world of Constantinople as the “New Jerusalem”.

We will begin our investigation in the ancient Near East, where major centers of pilgrimage developed from the fourth century on.  These sites considerably fueled the early Byzantine cult of relics and the associated artistic production.  The chief focus of the seminar will be on the major urban centers of the Byzantine Empire.  Thessaloniki and especially the capital city of Constantinople.  We will closely study different types of reliquaries manufactured in the Byzantine Empire over the centuries and investigate how their design responded to devotional needs, ritual practice and political claims.  Historical developments and primary texts (in English translation) will be addressed throughout to better understand the circumstances of the acquisition of relics and the motivations guiding their veneration.

Last but not least, we will explore the enormous impact the Byzantine cult of relics had on the religious life and artistic production of the Catholic West, particularly after the looting of Constantinople by the Latin invaders during the 13th century.  We will explore the repercussions that the extensive transfer of relics from the Christian East had on the architecture of western churches, their liturgical stetting and

Ident. HCHR 41604/ARTH 41602

RLIT 42204 Religion and Literature in France
T 10:30-1:20 S200

This course will consider the immediate post-WWII period in French Thought and will have as it central concern to show how debates over Marxism and Humanism were conducted in and through a re-evaluation of the categories of religion and literature.  We will be considering the influence of Heidegger, the emergence of Personalism, and the renaissance of postwar Judaism.  We will thus be reading the seminal figures in this debate: Sartre, Camus, Bataille, Blanchot, Levinas, and Jean Wahl. Most texts will be  available in translation but reading knowledge of French is highly recommended.

PQ: French reading skills preferred

RLIT 44400 Tibetan Auto/biography
T/R 10:30-11:50 ARR

In this course, we will explore the genres of biography and autobiography in Tibetan religious andliterary culture, with special emphasis on the latter. Though often considered a genrecharacteristic of-and exclusive to-Western modernity, autobiography has had a long and rich historyin Tibet, spanning at least a thousand years. We will begin the course by reading some theoreticalstudies of biography (including "hagiography") and autobiography. We will then consider some issuesspecific to Tibetan

auto/biography and its historical development. The remainder of the quarter will be spent in readingand analyzing representative examples of these genres, drawn from a variety of authors and periods.

PQ: Preferably some background in Tibetan or Buddhist studies.

Ident. HREL 44400/SALC 49002

Religions in America

RAME 42808 Religion and the Cold War
W 4:00-6:50 S208

This seminar considers the religious legacies and exigencies of the Cold War as it played out in the U.S. and throughout the post-WWII order of nation-states and 'rogue states.'  Special attention will be paid to Asia, Eastern Europe, the Middle East as well as to post-1965 diasporic communities in the U.S.  Topics include the rise of anti-communism and anti-Americanism, relations between Islamism and communism, discourses and practices of religious freedom, atheism, liberation, reunification and millenarian salvation. 

Ident. AASR 42808

RAME 42901 Christianity and Slavery in America, 1619-1865
T/TH 9:00-10:20 S201

This course examines the history of Christian thought and practice regarding slavery in the United States.  Particular attention is paid to Christian missions to slaves, debates about the abolition of slavery, the pro-slavery Christian defense, and the practice and evolution of slave religion.

Ident. HCHR 42901

RAME 43301 Religion in Modern America, 1865-1920
T/TH 1:30-2:50 S200

This course is a general history of religion in the United States from the Civil War to the 1920s. Special emphases include religious practice, interreligious encounters and conflicts, race, confrontation with modernity, and the changing social and public dimensions of religion in the US.

Ident. HCHR 43301

Religious Ethics

RETH 309 Minor Classics in Ethics
TH 12:15 - 1:30 S200

Class will meet on alternate weeks:  2nd, 4th, 6th, 8th, and 10th.

This is an informal, non-credit reading group of RETH Faculty and all students interested in religious ethics to discuss minor classics in contemporary ethics, philosophy, and theology.  No background is required. Selected articles have revitalized forgotten themes or have launched new problems for moral philosophy and religious ethics.

Please send email contact information to Prof. Richard Miller (rbm1@uchicago.edu) to gain access to the Google Drive, which posts the reading list and the readings in PDF.

DO NOT REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

RETH 34205 The Place of Science in Religious Environmental Ethics
T/TH 10:30-11:50 S208

This course examines the ways that religious environmental ethicists engage with scientific knowledge, metaphors, and methods.  We will first study theories of the interaction between science and ethics.  Next we will turn to examples of popular texts in religious environmental ethics to uncover how they do or do not interact with the physical, natural, and social sciences.  Particular attention will be paid to the authority granted to scientific results and the ways ethicists respond to the uncertainties of science.  Finally, we will read several critiques of the ways religious environmental ethicists interact with the sciences.  The overall aim of this course is to understand the strengths and limitations of interactions between science and religious ethics so we can make intentional decisions about how to interact with the sciences and, as a result, have a stronger ethic. 

PQ: Undergraduates may enroll with permission of instructor.

RETH 42604 Collective Guilt, Shame and Responsibility
M 6:00-8:50 S201

Collective guilt, shame, and responsibility have been growing topics of interest throughout the twentieth and twenty-first centuries as people have reflected upon the Holocaust and Apartheid and many other collective action problems.  This class will examine the moral emotions of guilt and shame and their ramifications both for ethical theory and the lived experience of individuals and communities.  We will particularly focus on a new challenge for existing theories of collective guilt, shame, and responsibility: climate change.  Its vast temporal and spatial scales and diffuse groups of perpetrators and victims challenge existing theories.  Indeed, some climate ethicists argue that responsibility is not a term that applies to climate change and that there is no reason to feel guilty or ashamed about it.  Yet, recent research suggests that many humans are feeling guilt, shame, and responsibility about their environmental activities including contributions to climate change.  In the face of these conflicting ideas and experiences we will explore three questions: What should we feel about climate change? What should we think about climate change?  How should we (as individuals and collectives) act in response to climate change?

RETH 42701 Trends in Contemporary Christian Ethics
M/W 10:30-11:50 S208

This course is a survey of contemporary trends in Christian ethics attentive to classical sources (biblical, theological, philosophical) and also basic themes that influence Christian reflection on the moral life. Noting classic sources ranging from the biblical portrait of Jesus’ ministry to scholastic theologians and the Protestant Reformers, the burden of the course will be to examine principal trends in contemporary thought. These trends include, among others, so-called narrative ethics, current work on the role of Christ in the moral life, feminist and revisionary forms of Roman Catholic ethics, and social teachings on topics ranging from economics to war and sex. The course will attend not only to fundamental conceptual and theoretical issues in contemporary Christian ethics, but also questions in applied ethics especially pressing in the current world situation.

Ident. THEO 42701

RETH 45102 Religion, Medicine, and Ethics
T 2:00-4:50 S400

This course surveys the contributions of leading figures in mainstream bioethics along with new voices in the field.  We will examine authors who have shaped academic writing and public policy in the United States along with the recent efflorescence of bioethics in different cultural contexts.  Key topics include human experimentation, death and dying, organ transplantation, medicine and social justice, alternative healing practices, and reproductive technologies.  These issues link up with ideas about the body, identity, freedom, gender, and visions of human welfare. Sources draw from Protestant, Catholic, Jewish, Buddhist, Muslim and western philosophical materials.  

RETH 45502 Religion and the Political Order
TH 2:00-4:50 S400

A critical examination of religion, ethics and political life in the works of medieval and early modern theorists.  Authors will include Augustine, Aquinas, Luther, Calvin, Anabaptists writers, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, and Rousseau.

RETH 50325 Public Morality and Legal Conservatism
W 4:00-6:00 ARR

Co-taught with Prof. William Baude

This seminar will study the philosophical background of contemporary legal arguments alluding to the idea of "public morality," in thinkers including Edmund Burke, James Fitzjames Stephen, and Patrick Devlin, and the criticisms of such arguments in thinkers including Jeremy Bentham, John Stuart Mill, and Herbert Hart.  We will then study legal arguments on a range of topics, including drugs and alcohol, gambling, nudity, pornography and obscenity, non-standard sex, and marriage.

Non-law students are welcome but need permission of the instructors, since space is limited.  We are aiming for a total enrollment of 30, of which up to 10 can be non-law students (no undergraduates), and the rest will be law students, selected by lottery.  Non-law students should apply to both professors by December 1, 2014, describing relevant background, especially in philosophy.

Ident. PHIL 50325/LAWS 78606

RETH 50700 Concepts and Problems: Life, Will and Value
W 1:30-4:20 S200

Given radical advances in genetics, technology, the life sciences and medicine, the reality and possible justification of war, as well environmental endangerments, the moral claim living beings make upon human responsibility has become pressing in contemporary thought and existence.  This seminar explores theme of “life” and “will” around the question of value. More specifically, the seminar moves through interrelated levels of reflection, ranging from accounts of what defines “life” through debates about the moral significance of the relation between human existence and other creatures, to, finally, the theological question of the moral significance of divine life.  We will start with Schopenhauer and Nietzsche and questions in Lebensphilosophie. With that background we will consider 20th century thinkers, specifically Schweitzer (reverence for life) and aspects of P. Ricoeur’s philosophy of will. The course ends with theological reflection on life by M. Moltmann, S. McFague and also Roman Catholic ethics (John Paul II).  The purpose of the seminar, accordingly, is to explore the range of position on this topic and to trace the significance of claims about the living God for moral responsibility

Ident. THEO 50700.

Theology

THEO 42701 Trends in Contemporary Christian Ethics
M/W 10:30-11:50 S208

This course is a survey of contemporary trends in Christian ethics attentive to classical sources (biblical, theological, philosophical) and also basic themes that influence Christian reflection on the moral life. Noting classic sources ranging from the biblical portrait of Jesus’ ministry to scholastic theologians and the Protestant Reformers, the burden of the course will be to examine principal trends in contemporary thought. These trends include, among others, so-called narrative ethics, current work on the role of Christ in the moral life, feminist and revisionary forms of Roman Catholic ethics, and social teachings on topics ranging from economics to war and sex. The course will attend not only to fundamental conceptual and theoretical issues in contemporary Christian ethics, but also questions in applied ethics especially pressing in the current world situation.

Ident. RETH 42701

THEO 43102 Early Modern Catholicism
M/W 10:30-11:50 S200

This survey course examines the history of Catholicism from the fourteenth through the sixteenth centuries.  The main focus will be on the latter.   The course will address the questions about the nature of reform, the issues of authority and ecclesiology, the rise of heresy, and the interest in spiritual exercises and mysticism.  Some of the authors and texts will include The Modern Devotion, Johann Tauler, John Huss, John Eck, Thomas More, Thomas Cajetan, Ignatius of Loyola, and Teresa of Avila.  We will examine the sixteenth-century Catholic responses to the writings of the Protestant reformers.  Close attention will be paid to the conciliar decisions of the Council of Constance, Lateran V, and the Council of Trent.  We will also focus on the different concerns of the Spanish Inquisition.

Ident. HCHR 43102

THEO 43806 Readings in Luther
M 1:30-4:20 MMC Library

This class will read sources that illustrate the development of Luther’s thought as expressed in various genres.   We will study Luther’s disputations, polemical treatises, and his exegetical works.  We will look at both his main doctrinal themes as well as his underlying assumptions.  We will also try to understand the nature and purpose of sixteenth-century polemics.

Ident. HCHR 43806 

THEO 50700 Concepts and Problems: Life, Will and Value
W 1:30-4:20 S200

Given radical advances in genetics, technology, the life sciences and medicine, the reality and possible justification of war, as well environmental endangerments, the moral claim living beings make upon human responsibility has become pressing in contemporary thought and existence.  This seminar explores theme of “life” and “will” around the question of value. More specifically, the seminar moves through interrelated levels of reflection, ranging from accounts of what defines “life” through debates about the moral significance of the relation between human existence and other creatures, to, finally, the theological question of the moral significance of divine life.  We will start with Schopenhauer and Nietzsche and questions in Lebensphilosophie. With that background we will consider 20th century thinkers, specifically Schweitzer (reverence for life) and aspects of P. Ricoeur’s philosophy of will. The course ends with theological reflection on life by M. Moltmann, S. McFague and also Roman Catholic ethics (John Paul II).  The purpose of the seminar, accordingly, is to explore the range of position on this topic and to trace the significance of claims about the living God for moral responsibility

Ident. RETH 50700.

THEO 58804 Seminar: Dissertation Methodology
ARR ARR

A two-week seminar on the methodology of advanced research and writing for Ph.D. students in the dissertation stage of their program.  Each student will present a selection from their current work, followed by a response from Prof. Marion and a discussion-format critique.  The presentations will be reserved primarily for students in ABD status.  Those not yet dissertating  but in the final stage of their qualifying exams and proposal submissions are encouraged to engage in the discussion portion of the seminar

The seminar will be scheduled over 2-3 hour sessions each week from February 8-19.    Enrollment limit:  12

Ident. DVPR 58804