Courses

Anthropology and Sociology of Religion

AASR 33600 Anthropology of Religion
TH 9:00-11:50 S208

A critical survey of some of the key theoretical issues in the anthropology of religion. Topics will include some or all of the following: belief and skepticism, ritual action, semiotics and materiality, embodiment, ethical self-fashioning, and the politics of representation. Readings will consist of theoretical essays and ethnographies.

Ident. ANTH 35030

AASR 41004 Shi’ism and Modernity
W 1:30-4:20 S201

Ident. ISLM 41004/NEHC 41004/ ANTH 41004

AASR 43202 Revelation or Revolution? The Question of Interior Worlds
W 6:30-9:20 pm S200

Instructor: Betty Bayer

This course revisits the tangle of history in relations amongst psychology, religion and science through three key moments.  It begins with consideration of nineteenth century’s dramatic rise in all things spiritual – spirit mediums, visions, auditions, prophecies and other sensations. This moment is said to have nurtured the ground of William James’s signature study of varieties of religious experience as one earmarking an historic turn to the life of the interior.  We will tackle further claims of how this moment and the spiritual movement introduced new vocabularies – psychological, religious and spiritual -- of the mind (dynamic unconscious, telepathy), self (subliminal self), social and sexual life.  We will ask if these claims of metamorphosis in our very way of being translated into transformations of what it meant to see ourselves as religious, psychological or spiritual as well.  We will then examine two additional moments deemed indicative of sea changes in human understanding, the mid-twentieth and early 21st centuries. The 1950s will be explored through When Prophecy Fails, a book deemed a classic in psychology and religion and said to transform study of groups, cults and prophecy.  Our third case history will bring us into debates in the early 21st on the new brainhood, or neuropsychology.   Works drawn on will range from those crossing the bounds of religion and psychology to history of science works examining the tangle of history amongst religion, psychology and science.  We will ask what these moments say regarding relations amongst psychology, religion, spirituality and science outside of familiar rehearsals of their age-old entanglements as stories of the parting of ways, occasions of borrowing from one another’s models, and/or pangs of growth and maturation.  

Ident. GNSE 43202, RAME 43202

Bible

BIBL 30405 Jewish Thought and Literature II: The Bible and Archaeology
T/TH 1:30-2:50 SS 105

In this course we will look at how interpretation of evidence unearthed by archaeologists contributes to a historical-critical reading of the Bible, and vice versa.  We will focus on the cultural background of the biblical narratives, from the stories of Creation and Flood to the destruction of the Jerusalem temple by the Romans in the year 70.

PQ:  No prior coursework in archaeology or biblical studies in required, although it will be helpful for students to have taken JWSC 20004 (Introduction to the Hebrew Bible) in the Autumn quarter.

Ident. NEHC 30405/JWSC 20005/NEHC 20405/RLST 20408

BIBL 32500 Introduction to the New Testament: Texts and Contexts
T/TH 10:30-11:50 S106

An immersion in the texts of the New Testament with the following goals: 1. Through careful reading to come to know well some representative pieces of this literature; 2. To gain useful knowledge of the historical, geographic, social, religious, cultural and political contexts of these texts and the events they relate; 3. To learn the major literary genres represented in the canon (“gospels,” “acts,” “letters,” and "apocalypses”) and strategies for reading them; 4. To comprehend the various theological visions to which these texts give expression; 5. To situate oneself and one’s prevailing questions about this material in the history of research, and to reflect on the goals and methods of interpretation; 6. To raise questions for further study.

Discussion groups will meet on Fridays, 12:00-1:00 in S201 and S208.

Ident. RLST 12000/FNDL 28202

BIBL 36914 Death in the Classical World: Texts and Monuments
ARR ARR

Instructor: Sofia Torallas Tovar (Classics)

This course will focus on the evolution of beliefs and rituals related to death in the Mediterranean cultures of the Greek world and the Roman Empire, including the Egyptians among others.  The course will draw on literary and documentary sources as well as archaeology and remnants of material culture. The topics that will be covered include not only the practicalities of death (funerary rituals, legal aspects of death, like wills and inheritance), but also beliefs and myths of the afterlife, magical rituals such as necromancy, the impact of Christianization on Roman understandings of death, and later Christian developments like the cult of the saints.

Ident. CLAS 36914

BIBL 40300 The Gospel of Luke
M/W 9:00-11:00 S208

“…inter omnes evangelistas graeci sermonis eruditissimus” (“…among all evangelist the one best versed in the Greek language”), this is the impression Jerome had won from Luke’s writings (Gospel and Acts). And indeed, Luke certainly is the best storyteller and the most literate writer among the four evangelists. This can already be seen from the prologue in Lk 1:1-4, and we will begin our class with this text. Then other important chapters of Luke’s Gospel will be discussed and explained. Special emphasis will be given to narrative form, intertextuality with the Greek Bible and social background.

PQ: No Greek necessary; a special section with Greek reading will be offered 10:20-11:00)

BIBL 48402 Judges
T/TH 9:00-10:20 S400

This is a reading and exegesis course on the book of Judges.  All texts will be read in Hebrew.  This course is appropriate for students who have completed the first year Hebrew sequence in the Divinity School.

PQ: One year biblical Hebrew

BIBL 49800 Origen of Alexandria
T/TH 12:00-1:30 S403

It is difficult to conceive of doing justice to the vast scope of Origen's work in one quarter, but we will do our best to sample generous selections from the Greek text of his exegetical, homiletic, and doctrinal writing, including a substantive selection from his Treatise on Prayer and perhaps the section of the Dialogue with Heracleides preserved among the Tura papyri. We will of course focus on Origen as the greatest exponent of the allegorical method of biblical interpretation and its Platonic underpinnings. We will also consider carefully the style of his Greek and his position as a Christian apologist.

PQ: At least three years of Greek (or by consent of instructor)

Ident. GREK 37100

BIBL 50804 Biblical Interpretation in the Qumran Scrolls
Tu/Th 1:30-2:50 S208
This course will consider the various forms of biblical interpretation in the Dead Sea Scrolls, from biblical scrolls to the so-called “rewritten Bible” to pesharim and various other texts containing biblical interpretations.   All texts will be read in their original languages (Hebrew and Aramaic).
 
PQ:  Two years of biblical Hebrew; Aramaic
 
 

Divinity School

DVSC 42000 German Reading Exam

Monday, April 20 at 6:00 p.m.

DVSC 45100 Reading Course: Special Topic

Staff: ARR

PQ: Petition with bibliography signed by instructor; enter section number from faculty list.

DVSC 49900 Exam Preparation

Staff: ARR

PQ: Open only to Ph.D. students in quarter of qualifying exams.  Department consent.  Petition signed by Advisor.

DVSC 50100 Research: Divinity

Staff: ARR

PQ: Petition signed by instructor; enter section number from faculty list.

DVSC 59900 Thesis Work: Divinity

Staff: ARR

PQ: Petition signed by instructor; enter section number from faculty list.

History of Christianity

HCHR 30300 History of Christian Thought III
M/W 10:00-11:20 S106

Ident. THEO 30300

HCHR 41700 Calvin's Institutes
M 1:30-4:20 S201

Ident. THEO 41300

HCHR 44004 The Veneration of Icons in Byzantium: History, Theory and Practice
T 1:30-4:20 S201

In order to appreciate the pivotal religious significance icons had in Byzantium for private devotion, in the liturgy, in civic ritual, and in military campaigns, we will survey the visual evidence along with a vast array of written sources. We will explore the origins of the Christian cult of icons in the Early Byzantine period and its roots in the Greco-Roman world of paganism. Through close analysis of icons executed over the centuries in different artistic techniques, we will examine matters of iconography, style and aesthetics. We will also have a close look at Byzantine image theory, as developed by theologians from early on and codified in the era of Iconoclasm.

Ident. RLIT 44004/ARTH 44014/RLST 28704

HCHR 44604 Byzantine Art: Iconography
TH 1:30-4:20 S201

This course is designed to familiarize students with some of the more prominent topics, sacred and profane, depicted in the visual arts of Byzantium and (where applicable) with their textual sources. Through close analysis of the specific functions, capacities and constraints of images we will gain a critical understanding of the place of the visual arts in Byzantine culture. Students will become familiar with the methodology and resources that are indispensable for approaching issues of iconography and iconology. During the quarter, students will improve their ability to describe systematically and with sophistication visual images in different media, styles and techniques.

Ident. RLIT 44604/ARTH 44604/ RLST 28304

HCHR 51702 Theological Criticism: Eschatology and Embodiment
TH 9:00-11:50 S403

The seminar on theological criticism focuses on the problem of how constructive theology can make responsible use of historical sources. While it is no longer sufficient to defend one’s theological position by staying within one’s confessional tradition, an eclectic attitude towards historical sources may not be a wise alternative. Without forcing theologians to become historians, this seminar deals with the larger issue of how to select and use one’s source material in such a way that the historical work is methodologically sound and the theological end product accessible, informative and properly constructive.

This year’s version will have a concrete theological critical focus on Eschatology and Embodiment. Starting from the position that incarnation is key to how humans embody the Kingdom of God, one can approach eschatology as a locus for contemplation, but also profitably consider it an intellectual arena for how best to act and be. The seminar will keep these two poles in tension, as we will analyze both historical and contemporary texts. After an analysis of two contemporary thinkers on eschatology and embodiment,  with respectively more and less groundedness in historical theological sources (S. Coakley, S. Copeland), two historical presentations of theological sources will be discussed, with and without an eye for contemporary theological interests (D. Turner, P. Brown). A selection of primary historical sources will be read and discussed both as artifacts of history and sources for constructive work.

In the remainder of the seminar students will design and execute a project of their own choosing on Eschatology and Embodiment. These projects will be presented and evaluated both for their theological relevance and their historical groundedness.

Themes that will be highlighted besides action and contemplation are the relationship between mind/soul and body, virtue and affect, protology and eschatology, history and theology, and be enriched by whatever else comes out of the individual student projects.

Ident. THEO 51702, HIST 66001

History of Judaism

HIJD 41100 Animal Spirituality in the Middle Ages
Th 3:00-5:50 S403

Ident. HREL 41101/ISLM 41100/RLIT 41101/RLST 22406

HIJD 45500 Medieval Commentaries on Ecclesiastes
W 3:00-5:50 S208

This course will introduce medieval Jewish biblical exegesis by focusing on a single case study: the history of commentaries on Ecclesiastes (Qohelet). Following a brief survey of modern scholarship on Ecclesiastes we will proceed chronologically from Rabbinic Midrash and Targum in late antiquity to the work of Karaites and Rabbanites, Pashtanim and Darshanim, Philosophers and Kabbalists.

 

Ident. RLIT 45500

History of Religions

HREL 33702 Ethical and Theological Issues in Hinduism
W/F 1:30-2:50 S200

An exploration of Hindu attitudes to, and mythologies of, women, animals, people of low caste, members of various religious groups, homosexuals, foreigners, criminals, and in general violators of the codes of dharma.

PQ:  Permission of the instructor (a seminar suitable for BA, MA and Ph.D students).

Ident. SALC 38304/SCTH/RLST 23904/SCTH 32202

HREL 35200 Tibetan Buddhism
T/TH 10:30-11:50 S201

This course is designed to serve as an introductory survey of the history, doctrines, institutions, and practices of Buddhism in Tibet from its origins in the mid-first-millennium through the end of the 20th century, Readings will be drawn both from primary sources (in translation) and secondary and tertiary scholarly research. This course may be taken to satisfy the “extended flexible core” requirement.

PQ: HREL 35100 or equivalent background in Buddhism highly recommended.

Ident. SALC 39001 

HREL 35802 Religions of Tang China and the Eastern Silk Road
T/TH 12:00-1:20 ARR

An introduction to the religious practices of the world encompassed by medieval Central Asia and Tang China, focusing on Buddhism Manichaeism, Zoroastrianism, and “Nestorian” Christianity.

Ident. EALC 25820/35820

HREL 41101 Animal Spirituality in the Middle Ages
Th 3:00-5:50 S403

Ident. HIJD 41100/ISLM 41100/RLIT 41101/RLST 22406

HREL 45200 Historiography for Historians of Religions
M/W 9:00-10:20 S200
HREL 46410 Origin Stories: Religion and Science Narrate the World
Th 1:30-4:20 S200

Co-instructor: Lorraine Daston (Social Thought and History)

What is the origin of the universe?  Human race?  Baby in the womb? In many epochs and cultures, these questions have generated answers that scholars nowadays classify as "mythology" or "religion" or "natural philosophy" or "science," although these domains were in fact often tightly intertwined. This course takes a cross-historical, cross-cultural perspective on the persistence of origins stories from the standpoint of both the history of religion and the history of science. Emphasis will lie on primary text readings and comparative analysis.

PQ: Undergraduate and Graduate students admitted by permission of the instructors.

Ident.  SCTH 30923

HREL 47001 Pahlavi Language and Literature
ARR ARR

PQ:  Interested students should contact the instuctor regarding time/day.

HREL 48203 Buddhist Narratives
M 3:30-6:20 F209

After an Introduction looking theoretically at the differences between systematic and narrative thought as forms of human cognition and discourse this course will read and analyze Buddhist narrative texts (mostly translated from Pali). Stories will include Jātaka tales (previous lives of the Buddha), the (extended) Lives of the Buddha Gotama and the next Buddha Metteyya (Maitreya), stories about the origin of society, kingship, Buddhist Nuns and other women, and the great Birth Story of Prince Vessantara. in which the future Buddha gives away his children and his wife. What do such stories achieve in the Buddhist imaginaire which doctrinal treatises and Suttas cannot?

PQ: Previous knowledge of Buddhism (at least one course).

Ident. SALC 48203

HREL 52200 Problems in the History of Religions
W 7:00-9:00pm Home

PQ:  Limited to students in the Ph.D. program in the History of Religions working on their colloquium paper, orals statement for the Qualifying Examination, or dissertation chapter.

Islamic Studies

ISLM 30636 Survey: Classical Arabic Literature in Translation
T/TH 10:30-11:50 Pick 218

Spanning seven centuries and three continents, classical Arabic literature developed in diverse artistic directions. Poetic genres such as brigand poetry, love lyrics, court panegyrics, satires, and mystical poetry, as well as prose genres such as scripture, orations, epistles, fables, mirrors for princes, and popular tales, all developed their own, fascinating features. Students read the texts in translation in an exploration of the culture and thought of the medieval Arabic speaking world. All readings are in English translation. Background in Arabic and/or Islamic studies helpful but not required.

Ident. NEHC 30636

ISLM 34000 Muslim Worship
M 9:00-11:50 S400

This is a one-quarter, graduate-level course. It has no prerequisites and is open to students of all backgrounds. The course will cover the most prominent types of worship in Islam: Ritual purification, prayer, fasting, pilgrimage, almsgiving, Qur’anic recitation, and invocations of remembrance (dhikr). Students will analyze the outward forms of Islamic worship and consider their perceived or constructed inner dimensions, including relevant terminologies and concepts. They will have exposure to both the Sunni and Shia perspectives with special attention to the role and experiences of women. Readings include primary sources from the Islamic tradition in translation in addition to secondary texts drawn from a variety of disciplines such as Islamic studies, the history of religions, and anthropology. Each session shall last three hours and be based on assigned readings. Classes shall begin with a lecture followed by discussion. Students who complete the course should be able to speak confidently about the outward forms and inner dimensions of Islamic worship, its terminologies and basic concepts, and how they relate to the Muslim conception of human beings, God, and the world.

Evaluations will be based on class participation (50%) and a paper (50%) chosen in consultation with Dr. Abd-Allah. Students should try to do the readings for each class in the order they are listed. Generally speaking, the readings for each class are listed according to the priority of their importance for class purposes. Auditors are expected to keep abreast of the preparatory readings.

Ident. CHRM 34000

ISLM 40384 Pre-Islamic Poetry: Mu’allaqat, Sa’alik, Ritha
T 1:30-4:20 Pick 218

Pre-Islamic poetry laid the foundation for all subsequent Arabic poetry, and formed a key referent for Arabic grammar and Qurʾān exegesis. Its structure, motifs, and images constituted a literary model for Umayyad, Abbasid, Fatimid, Andalusian, and Mamluk poetry, and its grammatical and lexical usages formed a tool to understand the Qurʾānic message and to measure the purity of later Arabic expressions. In this class, we will read closely some of the best known poems of the pre-Islamic period. An assessment by the medieval critics of our poets and some of their poetic theory will also be introduced. Secondary literature will be assigned in order to provide a theoretical framework for the material.

Ident. NEHC 40384

ISLM 41004 Shi’ism and Modernity
W 1:30-4:20 S201

Ident. AASR 41004/NEHC 41004/ ANTH 41004

ISLM 41100 Animal Spirituality in the Middle Ages
Th 3:00-5:50 S403

Ident. HREL 41101/HIJD 41100/RLIT 41101/RLST 22406

Ministry and Religious Leadership

CHRM 30700 Introduction to Ministry Studies: Colloquium
W 1:30-2:50 S400

This year-long integration seminar grounds first year M.Div. students in habits and perspectives that will cultivate the discipline of attention--learning to read closely, to listen deeply, to interrogate their experience, and to participate in rigorous critical conversation. During the first quarter, students will explore the relationship of narrative and theology; the second quarter will engage students in a close encounter with urban ministry; during the third quarter, students will integrate tradition, reason, and experience as they articulate definitions of ministry

PQ:  First year M.DIVs only; course meets all year.   DO NOT REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

CHRM 34000 Muslim Worship
M 9:00-11:50 S400

This is a one-quarter, graduate-level course. It has no prerequisites and is open to students of all backgrounds. The course will cover the most prominent types of worship in Islam: Ritual purification, prayer, fasting, pilgrimage, almsgiving, Qur’anic recitation, and invocations of remembrance (dhikr). Students will analyze the outward forms of Islamic worship and consider their perceived or constructed inner dimensions, including relevant terminologies and concepts. They will have exposure to both the Sunni and Shia perspectives with special attention to the role and experiences of women. Readings include primary sources from the Islamic tradition in translation in addition to secondary texts drawn from a variety of disciplines such as Islamic studies, the history of religions, and anthropology. Each session shall last three hours and be based on assigned readings. Classes shall begin with a lecture followed by discussion. Students who complete the course should be able to speak confidently about the outward forms and inner dimensions of Islamic worship, its terminologies and basic concepts, and how they relate to the Muslim conception of human beings, God, and the world.

Evaluations will be based on class participation (50%) and a paper (50%) chosen in consultation with Dr. Abd-Allah. Students should try to do the readings for each class in the order they are listed. Generally speaking, the readings for each class are listed according to the priority of their importance for class purposes. Auditors are expected to keep abreast of the preparatory readings.

Ident. ISLM 34000

CHRM 35300 Arts of Ministry: Community, Leadership, and Change
F 9:00-11:50 S400

This course is the third of a three-quarter sequence introducing students to essential aspects of religious leadership; the sequence is required for second-year MDiv students and complements their field education experience. In this final quarter of the year-long sequence, students study congregations as "communities-within-communities," examining the public life of congregations and their leaders as responsible agents of change, both within the religious community and in the wider context. Through research projects and case studies, students practice the skills of analysis, decision-making, negotiation and visioning that are essential to organizational vitality and constructive community engagement

PQ:  Second year M.DIV. students, others by permission of instructor

CHRM 40800 Practice of Ministry III
F 1:00-3:00 S400

PQ:  2nd year M.DIV. students only

CHRM 50300 Advanced Pastoral Care Seminar: Relationship, Marriage, and Family
W 9:00-11:50 S201

PQ: Open to students who have taken the Arts of Ministry: Pastoral Care course, or by permission of instructor.

Philosophy of Religions

DVPR 31802 Introduction to Phenomenology: Husserl
M 3:00-5:50 S106

The purpose of this course is to introduce the main themes and the method of phenomenology, by focusing on the 1913 standard exposition of the "idealist turn" of Husserl. By an internal and close reading of this text, one will discover that phenomenology does not consist first in a doctrine or a set of theoretical propositions, but mostly and above all in a series of intellectual operations, intended to allow things to appear as themselves, and not as what we commonly assume they are. 

PQ: Knowledge of French, German, Latin, and classical Greek is helpful but not required. 

Ident. THEO 31802/SCTH 34520/PHIL 36905

DVPR 32900 Kant on Religion and Rational Theology
M/W 10:11:20 S403

This course will examine the roles of religion and theology in the philosophy of Immanuel Kant. Drawing from Kant’s pre-critical and critical writings, it will trace the development of his late views on the relationship between reason and faith, placing these views in the context of 18th accounts of religion. We will be especially concerned with the place of Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason (1793) in Kant’s corpus, as well as the effect this work had upon the initial reception of his philosophy in general.

Ident. THEO 32900 

DVPR 45600 Derrida's 'Of Grammatology'
W 1:30-4:20 S403

We will devote ourselves to doing a close reading of Derrida’s seminal text Of Grammatology.  We will be reading Derrida’s sources—Rousseau, Saussure, and Levi-Strauss—along with the text, with the aim of ferreting out the stakes of his exegetical choices.  The goal will be to consider how Derrida uses textual study as a means to position himself on the margins of the discipline of philosophy. We will consider as well other essays from the period in Writing and Difference and elsewhere.

Ident. RLIT 45600

DVPR 50902 The Infinite: From Hegel to the Present
M 1:30-4:20 S200

A study of various accounts of infinity and the infinite in 19th, 20th, and 21st century philosophical and theological sources.  In this course we will begin by examining philosophical conceptions of infinity in the context of German Idealism, with special attention paid to Hegel. We will then consider the role of the infinite in late-18th and early 19th c. sources, before turning to the role of the infinite in the phenomenological tradition, with special attention paid to Martin Heidegger's middle and later writings, and its impact on philosophical and theological reflection. Topics to be discussed include: finitude and cognition of the infinite; the infinity of space and time; repetition, recursion, and infinity; alterity; eternity.

DVPR 55401 The Concept of Revelation Between Philosophy and Theology II
T 3:00-5:50 S106

This course continues the development of a new analytical and phenomenological approach to the relationship between revelation and reason (revelatio et ratio), between theology and philosophy, as they are constructed in Enlightenment and post-Enlightenment thought, and in close relationship to their patristic precursors.  Specific themes to be engaged include: relevation as paradox ; the different forms of knowledge implied in ratio (with discussion of Scheleiermacher, Hegel, Spinoza, Kant and Fichte); and the role of the Trinity between relevation and reason (with particular attention to Basil and Augustine, as well as Hegel, Schelling and von Balthasar).

PQ: Enrollment in the spring 2014 seminar (The Concept of Revelation between Theology and Philosophy I will be helpful, but is not required). Knowledge of French, German, Latin, and classical Greek is also helpful but not required. 

Ident. THEO 55401/SCTH 54603/PHIL 53421

Religion and Literature

RLIT 32400 Theory of Literature: The Twentieth Century
T/TH 3:00-4:20 S208

This course will be a survey of 20th century literary criticism, considering the century’s most influential theories: phenomenology, hermeneutics, reception theory, Marxism, psychoanalysis, structuralism, post-structuralism, and new historicism. We will also consider some of the 19th century texts that serve as the philosophical sources for these movements as well as the political implications and movements that develop in conjunction with these theories.

RLIT 38802 Pilgrimage in Antiquity and the Early Christendom
M/W 1:30-4:30 CWAC

This course will present an interdisciplinary interrogation into the nature of pilgrimage in pre-Christian antiquity and the rise of Christian pilgrimage in the years after Constantine.  It will simultaneously be a reflection on the disciplinary problems of examining the phenomena of pilgrimage from various standpoints including art history, archaeology, anthropology, the history of religions, the literary study of travel writing, as well as on the difficulties of reading broad and general theories against the bitty minutiae of ancient evidence and source material.  The core material, beyond the theoretical overview, will be largely limited to antiquity and early Christianity; but if students wish to write their papers on areas beyond this relatively narrow remit (in other religions, in the middle ages, modern or early modern periods), this will be positively encouraged! The course will be taught in an intensive format over 5 weeks, plus some individual discussion sessions to set up term papers. 

PQ:  This course will be taught in an intensive twice a week format over 5 weeks.   First class will meet on Monday, April 6.

Ident. ARTH 25300/35300

RLIT 39803 The Image of American Religion
F 9:00-11:50 S200

Instructor: John Howell

 


This course explores recent and touchstone scholarship in the emergent field of religion and American visual culture. Beginning with a brief survey of influences and antecedents—“lived religion,” New Historicism, the protocols of formal analysis, and the “Pictorial Turn”—we will proceed to examine the uses scholars (of American Religious History and of Art History, principally) make of visual phenomena (photographs, paintings, illustrations, cartoons, ephemera) in understanding and narrating American religions and religious practice. The course’s organizing questions include: What role does formal analysis play in arguments from and about visual phenomena? How do scholars’ historical and theoretical commitments delimit the visual field? And how does (and how do scholars claim that) attention to visual culture affect(s) the telling of American religious history? Throughout the course, additionally, we will practice the formal analysis of visual artifacts and think through the ways in which this work might ramify out to historical argumentation. The course’s assessment structure will conduce to the student’s crafting of a seminar paper treating a visual phenomenon (an image, a series of images, an ad campaign, etc.) of her or his choosing.

PQ:  Open to advanced undergraduate with consent of instructor

IDENT  RAME 39803

RLIT 41101 Animal Spirituality in the Middle Ages
Th 3:00-5:50 S403

Ident. HREL 41101/HIJD 41100/ISLM 41100/RLST 22406

RLIT 41502 Between Vienna and Hamburg: From Deutschland to America: the Writing of Art History Between 1900 and 1960
T/TH 9:00-11:50 CWAC

This course will explore the foundations of the art historical approaches in Germany in the Twentieth century that have proved most formative for the development of the discipline in Anglo-American contexts after the Second World War.  It is a coherent if highly complex and conflictive story to uncover. In what was effectively the most philosophically intense moment in art history from 1900 to the early 30's (including interventions from both the neo-Kantians and from Heidegger), Jewish, Protestant and Catholic art historians with a significant and conflicted relation to the aesthetic apogee of European culture in different milieux and cultural contexts strove to resolve some fundamental ideals about and investments in Bildung (cultural formation).   The relation of the discipline and its exiles to the rise, triumph and demise of the Third Reich, form the fundamental backdrop to the development of art history in the post-War period.The course will be taught in 5 weeks, in two 3 hour sessions per week.

PQ:  This course will be taught in an intensive twice a week format over 5 weeks.   First class will meet on Tuesday, April 7.

Ident. ARTH 41502

RLIT 44004 The Veneration of Icons in Byzantium: History, Theory and Practice
T 1:30-4:20 S201

In order to appreciate the pivotal religious significance icons had in Byzantium for private devotion, in the liturgy, in civic ritual, and in military campaigns, we will survey the visual evidence along with a vast array of written sources. We will explore the origins of the Christian cult of icons in the Early Byzantine period and its roots in the Greco-Roman world of paganism. Through close analysis of icons executed over the centuries in different artistic techniques, we will examine matters of iconography, style and aesthetics. We will also have a close look at Byzantine image theory, as developed by theologians from early on and codified in the era of Iconoclasm.

Ident. HCHR 44004/ARTH 44014/RLST 28704

RLIT 44604 Byzantine Art: Iconography
TH 1:30-4:20 S201

This course is designed to familiarize students with some of the more prominent topics, sacred and profane, depicted in the visual arts of Byzantium and (where applicable) with their textual sources. Through close analysis of the specific functions, capacities and constraints of images we will gain a critical understanding of the place of the visual arts in Byzantine culture. Students will become familiar with the methodology and resources that are indispensable for approaching issues of iconography and iconology. During the quarter, students will improve their ability to describe systematically and with sophistication visual images in different media, styles and techniques.

Ident. HCHR 44604/ARTH 44604/RLST 28304

RLIT 45500 Medieval Commentaries on Ecclesiastes
W 3:00-5:50 S208

This course will introduce medieval Jewish biblical exegesis by focusing on a single case study: the history of commentaries on Ecclesiastes (Qohelet). Following a brief survey of modern scholarship on Ecclesiastes we will proceed chronologically from Rabbinic Midrash and Targum in late antiquity to the work of Karaites and Rabbanites, Pashtanim and Darshanim, Philosophers and Kabbalists.

 

Ident. HIJD 45500

RLIT 45600 Derrida's 'Of Grammatology'
W 1:30-4:20 S403

We will devote ourselves to doing a close reading of Derrida’s seminal text Of Grammatology.  We will be reading Derrida’s sources—Rousseau, Saussure, and Levi-Strauss—along with the text, with the aim of ferreting out the stakes of his exegetical choices.  The goal will be to consider how Derrida uses textual study as a means to position himself on the margins of the discipline of philosophy. We will consider as well other essays from the period in Writing and Difference and elsewhere.

Ident. DVPR 45600

Religions in America

RAME 39803 The Image of American Religion
F 9:00-11:50 S200

Instructor: John Howell
 

This course explores recent and touchstone scholarship in the emergent field of religion and American visual culture. Beginning with a brief survey of influences and antecedents—“lived religion,” New Historicism, the protocols of formal analysis, and the “Pictorial Turn”—we will proceed to examine the uses scholars (of American Religious History and of Art History, principally) make of visual phenomena (photographs, paintings, illustrations, cartoons, ephemera) in understanding and narrating American religions and religious practice. The course’s organizing questions include: What role does formal analysis play in arguments from and about visual phenomena? How do scholars’ historical and theoretical commitments delimit the visual field? And how does (and how do scholars claim that) attention to visual culture affect(s) the telling of American religious history? Throughout the course, additionally, we will practice the formal analysis of visual artifacts and think through the ways in which this work might ramify out to historical argumentation. The course’s assessment structure will conduce to the student’s crafting of a seminar paper treating a visual phenomenon (an image, a series of images, an ad campaign, etc.) of her or his choosing.

PQ:  Open to advanced undergraduate with consent of instructor

IDENT  RLIT 39803

RAME 43202 Revelation or Revolution? The Question of Interior Worlds
W 6:30-9:20 pm S200

Instructor: Betty Bayer

This course revisits the tangle of history in relations amongst psychology, religion and science through three key moments.  It begins with consideration of nineteenth century’s dramatic rise in all things spiritual – spirit mediums, visions, auditions, prophecies and other sensations. This moment is said to have nurtured the ground of William James’s signature study of varieties of religious experience as one earmarking an historic turn to the life of the interior.  We will tackle further claims of how this moment and the spiritual movement introduced new vocabularies – psychological, religious and spiritual -- of the mind (dynamic unconscious, telepathy), self (subliminal self), social and sexual life.  We will ask if these claims of metamorphosis in our very way of being translated into transformations of what it meant to see ourselves as religious, psychological or spiritual as well.  We will then examine two additional moments deemed indicative of sea changes in human understanding, the mid-twentieth and early 21st centuries. The 1950s will be explored through When Prophecy Fails, a book deemed a classic in psychology and religion and said to transform study of groups, cults and prophecy.  Our third case history will bring us into debates in the early 21st on the new brainhood, or neuropsychology.   Works drawn on will range from those crossing the bounds of religion and psychology to history of science works examining the tangle of history amongst religion, psychology and science.  We will ask what these moments say regarding relations amongst psychology, religion, spirituality and science outside of familiar rehearsals of their age-old entanglements as stories of the parting of ways, occasions of borrowing from one another’s models, and/or pangs of growth and maturation.  

Ident. GNSE 43202, AASR 43202

Religious Ethics

RETH 31200 History of Theological Ethics II
T/TH 9:00-10:20 S106

This is the second part of a two-part history.  It is conducted through the study of basic, classic texts. The course begins with the tumultuous period of the Reformation and the Renaissance arising from the so-called Middle Ages and so attention to rebirth of classical thought, the plight of women in the medieval world, the interactions among Jews, Christians and Muslims, and the rise of cities and even nations. The course then moves into the emergence of distinctly “modern” forms of ethics in the “Enlightenment,” through the romantic period and to the political, economic, and religious crises of the 20th century. The history ends with the emergence in the global field of the power interaction of the religions. While the golden thread of the history is the development and differentiation of Christian moral thinking, this is set within and compared with the complexity of traditions (philosophical, Jewish, Islamic) that intersect and often collide through centuries in Western thought. In this way, the exploration of one tradition opens onto rich comparative thinking. The course proceeds by lectures and discussion. Most readings are in translation. There will be a final examination.  This is a basic course and thus no previous work in theology, philosophy, or ethics is required.

Ident. THEO 31200

RETH 43900 Religion and Democracy
TH 1:30-4:20 S400

An examination of legal, philosophical, and theological views on the proper role of religious beliefs and religious communities within a democratic political process, with focus on contemporary United States politics.  Attention to the thought of John Courtney Murray, John Rawls, and Jeffrey Stout, among others.

RETH 45401 Theories of Medical Ethics
T 6:00-8:50 S200

Open to Divinity, Law, and Medical students, this seminar will involve a close reading and critique of the most prominent theories in contemporary medical ethics, including Principlism (Beauchamp and Childress), Utilitarianism (Singer; Epstein), Libertarianism (Engelhardt), Contractualism (Veatch), Foundationalism (Pellegrino and Thomasma), Casuistry (Jonsen and Toulmin), and Covenantal approaches (Ramsey; May). The class will be conducted in classical seminar style, with students assigned to lead the discussions of particular texts. Our interdisciplinary discussion will exemplify and provide a context for the interdisciplinary nature of the field.

Ident. LAWS 80403

Theology

THEO 30300 History of Christian Thought III
M/W 10:00-11:20 S106

Ident. HCHR 30300

THEO 31200 History of Theological Ethics II
T/TH 9:00-10:20 S106

This is the second part of a two-part history.  It is conducted through the study of basic, classic texts. The course begins with the tumultuous period of the Reformation and the Renaissance arising from the so-called Middle Ages and so attention to rebirth of classical thought, the plight of women in the medieval world, the interactions among Jews, Christians and Muslims, and the rise of cities and even nations. The course then moves into the emergence of distinctly “modern” forms of ethics in the “Enlightenment,” through the romantic period and to the political, economic, and religious crises of the 20th century. The history ends with the emergence in the global field of the power interaction of the religions. While the golden thread of the history is the development and differentiation of Christian moral thinking, this is set within and compared with the complexity of traditions (philosophical, Jewish, Islamic) that intersect and often collide through centuries in Western thought. In this way, the exploration of one tradition opens onto rich comparative thinking. The course proceeds by lectures and discussion. Most readings are in translation. There will be a final examination.  This is a basic course and thus no previous work in theology, philosophy, or ethics is required.

Ident. RETH 31200

THEO 31600 Introduction to Theology
M/W 1:30-2:50 S208
THEO 31802 Introduction to Phenomenology: Husserl
M 3:00-5:50 S106

The purpose of this course is to introduce the main themes and the method of phenomenology, by focusing on the 1913 standard exposition of the "idealist turn" of Husserl. By an internal and close reading of this text, one will discover that phenomenology does not consist first in a doctrine or a set of theoretical propositions, but mostly and above all in a series of intellectual operations, intended to allow things to appear as themselves, and not as what we commonly assume they are. 

PQ: Knowledge of French, German, Latin, and classical Greek is helpful but not required. 

Ident. DVPR 31802//SCTH 34520/PHIL 36905

 

Ident. DVPR 31802

THEO 32900 Kant on Religion and Rational Theology
M/W 10:11:20 S403

This course will examine the roles of religion and theology in the philosophy of Immanuel Kant. Drawing from Kant’s pre-critical and critical writings, it will trace the development of his late views on the relationship between reason and faith, placing these views in the context of 18th accounts of religion. We will be especially concerned with the place of Religion within the Boundaries of Mere Reason (1793) in Kant’s corpus, as well as the effect this work had upon the initial reception of his philosophy in general.

Ident. DVPR 32900 

THEO 41300 Calvin's Institutes
M 1:30-4:20 S201

Ident. HCHR 41700

THEO 42610 Theologies from the Underside of History
W 1:30-4:20 S106
This course compares and contrasts various systems and methods in contemporary Third World theologies, that is, Africa, Asia, and Latin America. As a backdrop for this critical comparative engagement, we will use the recent theological dialogues taking place in the Ecumenical Association of Third World Theologians (EATWOT). As we engage these systems of thought, we want to examine the logic of their theologies and the sources used to construct theology.
THEO 43501 Contemporary Models of Theology
T 9:00-11:50 S400

This course compares and contrasts various systems and methods in contemporary theology. By contemporary, we mean theological developments in the U.S.A. from the late 1960s to the present. Specifically, we reflect critically on the following models: progressive liberal, post liberal, black theology, feminist theology, womanist theology, and postcolonial theology. As we engage these systems of thought, we want to examine the logic of their thinking and the sources used to construct their theologies.

THEO 46006 Approaches to Suffering: Theological Perspectives and Contemporary Meditations
T/TH 1:30-2:50 S403

Beginning with Elaine Scarry's The Body in Pain, Susan Sontag on the representation of suffering, and possibly Judith Butler on grief and "precarious life," this seminar will seek to extend and enrich such contemporary meditations through conversation with classic theological and religious approaches to suffering. Through close reading of selected theological works (e.g., John Calvin, the Isenheim altarpiece, liberation theologians), we will consider interpretive frames such as creation and providence, divine judgment and redemption, wounding and healing, and crucifixion and resurrection, together with religious responses such as introspection and contemplation, mourning, and witness.

 

THEO 47202 Barth’s Church Dogmatics
T 1:30-4:20 S400
THEO 51702 Theological Criticism: Eschatology and Embodiment
TH 9:00-11:50 S403

The seminar on theological criticism focuses on the problem of how constructive theology can make responsible use of historical sources. While it is no longer sufficient to defend one’s theological position by staying within one’s confessional tradition, an eclectic attitude towards historical sources may not be a wise alternative. Without forcing theologians to become historians, this seminar deals with the larger issue of how to select and use one’s source material in such a way that the historical work is methodologically sound and the theological end product accessible, informative and properly constructive.

This year’s version will have a concrete theological critical focus on Eschatology and Embodiment. Starting from the position that incarnation is key to how humans embody the Kingdom of God, one can approach eschatology as a locus for contemplation, but also profitably consider it an intellectual arena for how best to act and be. The seminar will keep these two poles in tension, as we will analyze both historical and contemporary texts. After an analysis of two contemporary thinkers on eschatology and embodiment,  with respectively more and less groundedness in historical theological sources (S. Coakley, S. Copeland), two historical presentations of theological sources will be discussed, with and without an eye for contemporary theological interests (D. Turner, P. Brown). A selection of primary historical sources will be read and discussed both as artifacts of history and sources for constructive work.

In the remainder of the seminar students will design and execute a project of their own choosing on Eschatology and Embodiment. These projects will be presented and evaluated both for their theological relevance and their historical groundedness.

Themes that will be highlighted besides action and contemplation are the relationship between mind/soul and body, virtue and affect, protology and eschatology, history and theology, and be enriched by whatever else comes out of the individual student projects.

Ident. HCHR 51702, HIST 66001

THEO 55401 The Concept of Revelation Between Philosophy and Theology II
T 3:00-5:50 S106

This course continues the development of a new analytical and phenomenological approach to the relationship between revelation and reason (revelatio et ratio), between theology and philosophy, as they are constructed in Enlightenment and post-Enlightenment thought, and in close relationship to their patristic precursors.  Specific themes to be engaged include: relevation as paradox ; the different forms of knowledge implied in ratio (with discussion of Scheleiermacher, Hegel, Spinoza, Kant and Fichte); and the role of the Trinity between relevation and reason (with particular attention to Basil and Augustine, as well as Hegel, Schelling and von Balthasar).

PQ: Enrollment in the spring 2014 seminar (The Concept of Revelation between Theology and Philosophy I will be helpful, but is not required). Knowledge of French, German, Latin, and classical Greek is also helpful but not required. 

Ident. DVPR 55401/SCTH 54603/PHIL 53421