Teaching Opportunities for Divinity Students

The list below provides an overview of the many teaching opportunities available to Divinity School students.  GAI point valuations are outlined below and indicated for each position. 

3 points

  • HPPS Coordinator (per year)

2 points

  • Lecturer

1 point

  • Writing Intern/Intern in the Core
  • Course Assistant/Lector
  • Teaching Assistant
  • Laboratory Assistant
  • BA Preceptor 

.5 points

  • Drill Instructor (Languages) 
  • Studio Assistant
  • Grader

Students ordinarily begin working as teaching assistants in the second or third year of their program, completing two assignments in each of the third and fourth years. A student should consult with their academic advisor to plan for the timing of qualifying exams and the completion of the teaching assignments. 

Undergraduate Program in Religious Studies

For more information about teaching opportunities in the Undergraduate Program in Religious Studies, students should contact the Dean of Students’ office.

Alma Wilson Teaching Fellowship (2 points) 

The Alma Wilson Teaching Fellowship is an opportunity for three to five graduate students from the Divinity School to teach a course of his or her own design in the Undergraduate Program in Religious Studies

Applications must include a cover letter and cv, along with the syllabus for the proposed course and the name of a faculty member who will provide letter of recommendation that speaks to your teaching abilities. Applications are typically due in late February or early March.

Wilson Fellows will be compensated as lecturers according to standard university policies for student teaching. For students beyond the GAI fellowship term, the Wilson Fellowship will also include tuition remission ($784) for the quarter in which they teach. 

 

B.A. Preceptors (3 points per year)

All College students who major in Religious Studies are required to write a BA paper of 30-50 pages in their fourth year under the supervision of a faculty adviser. In order to help them develop their papers, they are required to enroll in a two-quarter BA seminar in Autumn and Winter. The Undergraduate Program in Religious Studies hires one or two graduate student preceptors each year.  The duties of a preceptor are to lead the seminar which usually meets once per week for two hours, to be available to the students for scheduled office hours and to read and review the papers. In the Spring quarter, the preceptor assists in grading the papers and with helping the next year's group of students develop their paper proposals (these duties are very light).  We expect a class of five students next year. This is a wonderful way to begin learning how to guide other people to devise, research and write up manageable and interesting research projects. 

The application requires a cover letter and cv (as a single PDF document). Applications are typically due in late May.

Teaching Assistantships (1 point)

When an undergraduate course in Religious Studies reaches a particular size (usually twenty-five students), the professor has the option of hiring a teaching assistant. The Director of Undergraduate Studies will then solicit applications from Divinity School students and from other potentially qualified graduate students. The professor in charge of the course will select the most qualified student from the pool of applicants in consultation with the Dean of Students and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. These positions will normally become available only shortly before the beginning of the quarter in which the course is to be taught. They are not linked to financial aid.

Teaching assistantships are regularly available for Introduction to the Hebrew Bible, Introduction to the New Testament, and Introduction to Religious Studies.  In addition to these, two or more other TA positions are usually available in Religious Studies.  

Divinity School 

For more information about teaching opportunities at the Divinity School, students should contact the Dean of Students’ office.

Biblical Languages Lectureships (2 points)

The Divinity School appoints graduate students as lecturers in Introductory Biblical Hebrew I & II, Introductory Koine Greek I & II, and Introduction to Qur’anic Arabic I, II, and III.  The first two positions entail teaching undergraduate and graduate students during the autumn and winter quarters. The Qur’anic Arabic sequence is taught all three quarters. Applicants should possess expert knowledge of the respective language and of the Hebrew Bible, New Testament, or Qur’an, respectively.

All positions are contingent on final budgetary approval. Compensation for all positions will be according to the standard university rate and stipend withholding process for graduate student lecturtors. Applications should include a cover letter and CV. Applications are typically due in late May.

Teaching Assistantships (1 point)

Graduate students may also serve as teaching assistants for Divinity School courses.  Positions are regularly available for Introduction to the Hebrew Bible, Introduction to the New Testament, Introductory Biblical Hebrew, Introductory Koine Greek, and Introduction to the Study of Religion.  Other courses that may employ teaching assistants include the History of Christian Thought I-VI, History of Theological Ethics, Classical Theories of Religion, Contemporary Theories of Religion, Introduction to Theology, and the Ministry Program's Arts of Ministry sequence. 

The Director of Undergraduate Studies will then solicit applications from Divinity School students and from other potentially qualified graduate students. The professor in charge of the course will select the most qualified student from the pool of applicants in consultation with the Dean of Students and the Director of Undergraduate Studies. These positions will normally become available only shortly before the beginning of the quarter in which the course is to be taught. They are not linked to financial aid. Applications typically require a cover letter and CV.

Humanities Division 

Humanities Collegiate Division Core Lectureships (2 points)

Humanities Core Lectureships are stand-alone teaching positions in the Humanities Collegiate Division Core sequences available to advanced graduate students.  Applicants for these positions must have attained ABD status no later than the spring quarter prior to when the position will begin. PhD graduates from the Univeristy of Chicago and other institutions are encouraged to apply through the University of Chicago’s Academic Careers website (https://academiccareers.uchicago.edu/applicants/jsp/shared/Welcome_css.jsp)

 

Applicants may apply for more than one sequence. Complete descriptions of the Humanities Core sequences can be found in the College Catalog (http://collegecatalog.uchicago.edu/thecollege/humanities/)

 

Applications are typically due in late March. Questions should be directed to the HCD Office (hcd-jobs@uchicago.edu). More information can be found ( https://college.uchicago.edu/academics/apply-humanities-core-lectureships)

 

Writing Internships in the Humanities Common Core (1 point)

Graduate students from all divisions and schools are eligible. Graduate students who work as writing interns provide writing instruction for one of the year-long Humanities Core courses for University of Chicago first-year students. The goal is to give all students in the College a foundation of clear, reader-oriented writing techniques that they can use in whatever fields they choose to pursue. Interns attend the Humanities Core discussion (typically twice weekly for 80 minutes) and keeps up with class readings. The intern works leads a sequence of writing seminars that teach advanced academic writing for a group of no more than 7 students. Each group meets for three 80-minute seminars per quarter. If both the intern and the faculty member agree, the intern may teach one or two of the regular classes in the Core course. Interns usually serve for the entire academic year. 

Interns must participate in one quarter of training in HUMA 50000, Pedagogies of Writing, offered Spring quarter (10-week course that meets twice weekly) or Summer quarter (6-week course that meets four times each week). The training course is unpaid, but trainees may choose to either take it for credit or to take it unofficially so as to avoid tuition charges, depending on their funding status. 

Applications are typically due in February. These applications require a personal statement, a 10 page writing sample, and a student paper comment. The application packet will be updated annually and posted here (https://writing-program.uchicago.edu/content/writing-program-application-submission). Questions should be directed to writing-program@uchicago.eduAdditional details about the intern position may be found here(https://writing-program.uchicago.edu/jobs/intern)

 

                        MAPH Preceptor (3 points per year)

 

The Master of Arts Program in the Humanities (MAPH) appoints preceptors for the entire academic year.  Responsibilities include advising, discussion groups, and thesis writing workshops.  Calls for applications are circulated in February by the Division of the Humanities and administered through GRAD Gargoyle.

Writing Center (The Little Red Schoolhouse)

Lectors in Academic and Professional Writing (1 point)

Little Red Schoolhouse is a quarter-long course in advanced academic and professional writing offered to graduate students in the divisions, MBA students in the Graduate School of Business, and third and fourth-year undergraduates in the College.  Lectors lead a weekly (80 minute) seminar, critique student papers, and attend weekly lectures. 

Graduate students from all divisions and schools are eligible. Lectors are required to participate n one quarter of training in ENGL 50300, Principles of Teaching Writing, which is offered each Autumn quarter as a 10-week course that typically meets on Monday afternoons for both a small-group discussion and plenary lecture. 

Lectors receive $3,000 per section. Some advanced PhD students may be eligible for a higher salary as determined by the Dean of Students office.

Applications are typically due in February. These applications require a personal statement, a 10 page writing sample, and a student paper comment. The application packet will be updated annually and posted here (https://writing-program.uchicago.edu/content/writing-program-application-submission). Questions should be directed to writing-program@uchicago.edu.Additional details about the lector position may be found here(https://writing-program.uchicago.edu/jobs/lectors).

 

Writing Tutor (no points; compensation at an hourly rate)

A writing tutor teaches writing on a one-on-one basis, using reader-focused writing principles. Tutors work with undergrads on individual papers in order to improve students’ overall skills in academic argumentation and structure.

Graduate students from all divisions are eligible to apply. Tutors must participate in one quarter of training in HUMA 50000, Pedagogies of Writing, offered Spring quarter (10-week course that meets twice weekly) or Summer quarter (6-week course that meets four times each week). The training course is unpaid, but trainees may choose to either take it for credit or to take it unofficially so as to avoid tuition charges, depending on their funding status. 

Writing tutors are appointed quarterly and work weekly four-hours shifts. Students may work one or more shifts per week, depending on availability and student demand. The positions are renewable indefinitely pending satisfactory job performance and availability. Tutors start at $17/hour, and receive incremental raises with each quarter of experience. 

 

Applications are typically due in February. These applications require a personal statement, a 10 page writing sample, and a student paper comment. The application packet will be updated annually and posted here (https://writing-program.uchicago.edu/content/writing-program-application-submission). Questions should be directed to writing-program@uchicago.edu.More information about the tutor position can be found here (https://writing-program.uchicago.edu/jobs/tutor)

 

Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality

Graduate students from all divisions and professional schools are eligible to apply for teaching positions in the Center for the Study of Gender and Sexuality.  Applicants should have completed their preliminary exams by the start of the academic year in which they serve as an educator in the center. 

Applications are typically available in December and due in early March. Applications require a two-page CV, cover letter, and letter of recommendation from a faculty member. Students applying to teach the free-standing course should include a syllabus in their application. More information can be found here (https://gendersexuality.uchicago.edu/fellowships/teaching.shtml)

CSGS Lectureship (2 points)

Graduate students may apply to teach a CSGS free standing course engaged with feminist, queer, trans, or other refractions of gender and sexuality theory. These courses may be general, interdisciplinary, or highly specialized in areas of race/ethnicity, religion, medicine, and law. 

Co-Teaching Opportunity (1 point)

The CSGS offers two co-teaching opportunities for graduate students: “Problems in the Study of Gender and Sexuality” or “Advanced Theories of Gender and Sexuality.” Students may apply to teach in multiple quarters and will have the opportunity to rank their preferences. Applicants should have strong backgrounds in gender and sexuality studies. 

Teaching Assistantship (1 point)

The CSGS seeks a teaching assistant for the “Theories of Gender and Sexuality” course. This is a one-quarter, seminar-style introductory course for undergraduates. It is a program requirement for Gender and Sexuality Studies majors and minors. To apply as a teaching assistant, you must be working or have worked in an area of study related to gender and/or sexuality in a way that explicitly mobilizes theoretical concepts and questions of method. 

BA Preceptor (3 points per year)

The CSGS seeks a BA Preceptor to assist undergraduate Gender and Sexuality majors with their BA thesis papers. 

Center for the Study of Race, Politics and Culture

The Center for the Study of Race, Politics, and Culture provides several teaching opportunities. Applicants should be advanced graduate students with teaching experience. 

Applications are typically due mid-April. More information can be found here (https://csrpc.uchicago.edu/teaching/)

 

CSRPC Lectureships (2 points)

The CSRPC seeks graduate lecturers to teach undergraduate courses of their own design on topics related to race and ethnic studies. The courses may cover any related topic or theme: race or processes of racialization in comparative and transnational frameworks, the intersection of race and ethnicity with other identities, or interrogations of social and identity cleavages within racialized communities. 

BA Preceptors (3 points per year)

THE CSRPC seeks BA Preceptors for the majors and minors in Comparative Race and Ethnic Studies. The yearlong preceptorship position requires the graduate student to work with about ten fourth-year students and some third-years during the spring quarter. They read, edit, and supervise the writing of students’ BA theses, lead a sequence of courses to help students find research materials and to guide their academic writing, and hold weekly office hours. 

Social Sciences Division 

Applications include an online application and supplemental documentation including a cover letter, CV, and letter of recommendation. Lectureship applicants must also include a writing sample, such as a seminar paper, dissertation proposal, or dissertation chapter (under 25 pages). Students may apply for multiple positions but must complete an online application for each position. Applications are typically due in mid/late April. More information about both positions can be found here (https://college.uchicago.edu/academics/apply-teaching-positions-social-sciences-collegiate-division)

SSCD Core Lectureships (2 points)

SSCD Lecturers have full responsibility for teaching one or more sections of the SSCD Core course. Those who wish to apply for SSCD lectureships must first serve as interns. University of Chicago graduate students who will have graduated before or who will not be registered during the quarter of employment should apply as outside candidates to the lectureship. Applicants for lectureships in the Social Sciences Core can apply to only one Social Sciences Core sequence and for the Civilization Studies lectureships can apply to two sequences. 

SSCD Core and Civilization Course Interns (1 point)

Graduate students serve as course interns in the Social Sciences Collegiate Division's (SSCD) Core or Civilization sequences.  Interns are apprentices to the faculty in whose course they have been appointed and are expected to learn from the supervising faculty member how to teach a course in the Core Curriculum.  Internship length varies depending on the selected sequence. They range from 1 quarter to a full academic year. Interns must be registered PhD students at the University of Chicago during each quarter of the internship. 

MAPSS Preceptors (3 points per year)

The Master of Arts Program in the Social Sciences (MAPSS) hires graduate student preceptors in its one-year master's program.  Preceptors serve ten-month appointments, advising students and guiding them in the research and writing of their MA papers.  Contact MAPSS for more information.

CIR Preceptors (3 points)

The Committee on International Relations also rely on graduate student preceptors for its one year master's program.  Preceptors work closely with students as they select an MA topic and write their thesis.  Contact the CIR for more information.

Global Studies

Applications are normally submitted to Joshua Oxley at joxley@uchicago.eduin April. More information can be found https://anthropology.uchicago.edu/content/global-studies-graduate-teaching-opportunities.

 

Global Studies Core Lecturers (2 points)

Global Studies Core Lecturers teach a section of the core class Global Studies 2 (GLST 23102). Applicants should be PhD Candidates, have prior research experience, have an interest in the themes of the Global Studies program, and have a strong interest in and commitment to teaching research methods. Lecturers are required to attend weekly co-ordination meetings with other lecturers and program faculty. Applications should include CV, cover letter, names of two faculty recommenders, copies of past teaching evaluations, and a writing sample.

 

                        Global Studies Prize Lecturers (2 points) 

 

Prize Lecturers are advanced graduate students given an opportunity to teach a class of their own design that draws closely on their dissertation project and speaks to the many themes gathered under any one of the four tracks of the Global Studies program: Bodies and natures, knowledge and practices, cultures at work, and governance and affiaations. Applicants should be PhD candidates with research and writing interests related to any one of the Global Studies program tracks. Applications include a course proposal and syllabus, cover letter, copies of past teaching evaluations, CV, and the names of two faculty recommenders.

 

Global Studies Teaching Assistants (1 point)

Global Studies Program seeks advanced graduate students to assistant teach for its Global Studies 1 (GLST 23101). Assistants attend weekly class lecture and lead a weekly discussion session, hold office hours, and attend weekly co-ordination meetings. Applicants should be PhD Candidates, have teaching experience, and have an interest in the themes of the Global Studies Program. Applications include a cover letter, copies of past teaching evaluations, CV, and the names of two faculty recommenders. 

 

BA Global Studies Preceptors (3 points per year)

Global Studies Preceptors work closely with anywhere from 8 to 12 fourth-year students in the major, guiding them in preparation of a Bachelor’s Thesis. In addition, preceptors assist third year Global Studies students in development of their preliminary BA proposal. Applicants should be ABD in the Social Sciences or Humanities, demonstrate ability to advise in an interdisciplinary program, have excellent writing and editorial skills, have teaching experience, and have research interests that match the Global Studies Program tracks and themes. Applications include CV, cover letter, the names of two faculty recommenders, and copies of teaching evaluations, and a writing sample. 

 

Pozen Family Center for Human Rights

Human Rights Program Lectureship (2 point)

Each year, the Human Rights Program invites advanced graduate students to propose an undergraduate Human Rights course of their own design. The course should deal with human rights from a disciplinary, thematic, or regional perspective.  Applications are due mid-February. Applicants should be advanced doctoral students. Applications include a webform, CV, Course outline or syllabus, and one letter of recommendation. More information can be found here https://humanrights.uchicago.edu/awards/graduatelectureships

 

Center for Latin American Studies 

Please contact Natalie Arsenault for more information (ncarsenault@uchicago.edu).

BA Preceptor (3 points per year)

The Center for Latin American Studies appoints one graduate student preceptor to lead the B.A. Colloquium in Latin American Studies, a required course for Latin American Studies majors.  This is a full academic year appointment. Applicants should be advanced graduate students in Social Sciences or Humanities with the ability to advise undergraduate students with diverse disciplinary interests, including history, anthropology, economics, biological sciences, public policy, art history, and romance languages and literatures. Advanced graduate students in the Divinity School with a historical concentration are also encouraged to apply. More information can be found here https://clas.uchicago.edu/academic-programs/funding/BA-preceptorship

 

Latin American Studies Ignacio Martín Baró Prize Lectureship (2 points)

The Ignacio Martín Baró Prize Lectureship in Latin American Studies supports the design and teaching of a one-quarter undergraduate course focusing on a major Latin American political issue or question pertaining to human rights in Latin America.  Applications from all disciplines may be submitted to the Center for Latin American Studies. Applicants should be doctoral students who have defended the dissertation proposal or who have scheduled the dissertation proposal defense for no later than 1 quarter prior to the course’s teaching. More information can be found here https://clas.uchicago.edu/academic-programs/funding/martin-baro-lectureship

 

Teaching Assistantships (1 point)

The Center for Latin American Studies also appoints advanced graduate student teaching assistants for the Introduction to Latin American Civilizations course sequence.  Advanced graduate students who specialize in Latin America, regardless of academic discipline, are encouraged to apply. Teaching Assistants complete all reading assignments, attend class lectures, lead Friday discussion sections, hold office hours, meet regularly to discuss course material and teaching strategies, and design and grade class assignments and exams. Each quarter, one of the Friday sections is conducted in Spanish or Portuguese as part of the college’s Languages Across the Curriculum initiative. Spanish-proficient and Portuguese-proficient candidates are encouraged to apply to lead these sections. More information can be found here https://clas.uchicago.edu/academic-programs/funding/LA-civ-TAships

 

The Graham School 

Graham School Lectureships (2 points)

The Graham School of General Studies, one of the nation's oldest schools of continuing education, provides opportunities for Divinity students to teach stand-alone continuing education courses.  A committee of Divinity School faculty selects and submits 1-2 courses per quarter to be taught in the Graham School’s non-credit program.  Application procedures will be announced by the Divinity School's Dean of Students.  

Language Departments

Departmental Language Classes (2 points)

Some graduate students may be eligible to teach in certain departmental language courses.  Training is a prerequisite for many such language teaching positions.  Requirements vary substantially from department to department, so students should consult departmental websites and contact departmental administrators to inquire about requirements and availability. 

Chicago-Area Institutions 

Divinity graduate students often teach stand-alone courses (2 points) and assume teaching assistantships (1 point) at such area institutions as Northwestern UniversityDePaul UniversityLoyola UniversitySaint Xavier UniversityDominican UniversityLake Forest CollegeNational Louis UniversitySchool of the Art Institute of ChicagoNorth Park UniversityBenedictine UniversitySpertusCatholic Theological UnionLutheran School of TheologyMeadville Lombard Theological School, and Chicago Theological Seminary.

Other On-Campus Jobs and Teaching Opportunities

Current graduate students can use the GRAD Gargoyle website (CNET login required) to search for on-campus job opportunities and teaching appointments in specific divisions and programs.