Teaching in High Schools 

  Mark Maxwell, Noah Rachlin, and Brandon Cline

Monday, January 13  |  10:30am - 12pm
Swift Hall 208


Our panelists will speak about the various processes of certification, qualification, and application for teaching jobs in private and public high schools. Our experienced educators will talk about how to structure class time effectively and how to create and grade assignments so as to enable and optimize student learning at the secondary-level. Finally, they will talk about how to transition from a graduate program into a high school teaching position and what to expect about the responsibilities and habits of that professional role.
 
Brandon Cline earned his PhD in Early Christian Literature from the Divinity School in 2016. He teaches Latin at Trinity Valley Upper School, Fort Worth, TX. Mark Maxwell teaches English at Rolling Meadows High School, Rolling Meadows, IL. Noah Rachlin is Dean of Teaching and Learning at the University of Chicago Lab High School.

Breakfast will be served.


[introductory workshop / dean's seminar] 

 

 

Teaching the Introduction to the Study of Religion

  

Prof. John Holt, Bowdoin College

Tuesday, January 21  |  10am - 11:30am
Swift Common Room

  

Professor John Holt taught Introduction to the Study of Religion on more than 25 occasions over 40 years on the faculty at Bowdoin College. Having adjusted the course many times, he learned how to balance the tasks of engaging theory while focusing on various types of lived religion, in order to motivate a critical understanding in his students' learning experience. At this workshop, he will speak about the challenges of teaching a theoretical canon and strategies for integrating diverse religious voices and practices in such a course. He will give students the opportunity to develop their own ideas about how to approach teaching this course while using his own model as a guide.
 

John C. Holt, PhD ’77 (History of Religions) is William R. Kenan Professor Emeritus of Humanities in Religion and Asian Studies at Bowdoin College. He was the Divinity School Alumnus of the Year in 2007, has published 14 books about religion in South and Southeast Asia, and is currently a visiting professor at the Divinity School teaching courses about Theravada Buddhism.

Breakfast will be served.

[advanced / arts of teaching] 
 

Religious Diversity in the Religious Studies Classroom


Inclusive Pedagogy Fellows

Friday, January 24  |  11am - 1:00pm
Swift Hall Common Room


The Inclusive Pedagogy Fellows will lead a two-part conversation on how to acknowledge and plan for religious diversity in the religious studies classroom. Our fellows will draw on pedagogical texts by bell hooks, Robert Jackson, Margery Ginsberg, and contributors to the Lilly Seminar on Religion and Higher Education.
 
The Inclusive Pedagogy Fellows are a select group of Divinity School PhD students working together to learn best practices for teaching college students. Their work is funded by the Provost’s office and the Divinity School’s Craft of Teaching program.

Lunch will be served.

[introductory workshop / elective] 
 

Developing Questions for Learners

  

Josh Feigelson

Thursday, January 30  |  1pm - 2:30pm
Swift Common Room


Consider these two questions: What is the meaning of ‘responsibility?’ and, For whom are we responsible? Though the differences are slight, the discussion horizons shaped by these two questions can be profoundly different. In this workshop, former Divinity School Dean of Students Josh Feigelson will help participants reflect on the kinds of questions we ask in the classroom using typologies and frameworks he developed as Founder and Executive Director of the social startup Ask Big Questions. The workshop will help participants appreciate the differences in types of questions in an undergraduate course – questions for large group discussion, small group discussion, out-of-class assignments, and texts. We will also discuss when not to use questions, as well as how to teach students to write good research questions.
 
Josh Feigelson is president of Big Questions Associates LLC, a consulting practice serving educational nonprofits and foundations in North America. He is also a Senior Fellow at the iCenter for Israel Education and a member of the Chicago Scholars Circle of the Shalom Hartman Institute. An ordained rabbi, he also holds a PhD in religious studies from Northwestern University.

Coffee will be served.

[introductory workshop / Dean's Seminar] 
 

Choosing Texts for a Religious Studies Course

  

Lisa Landoe Hedrick, Adam Sonderberg, Mandy Burton, Prof. Richard Miller

February 5  |  10 am - 11:30am 
Swift 106


Our panelists will explain the challenges and processes for selecting, ordering, assigning, and evaluating texts for undergraduate religious studies courses. Adam Sonderberg from the Seminary Co-op will provide a new teacher orientation to finding and ordering academic books. Our other panelists will speak to their experiences selecting and assigning texts to students in different institutional contexts. Finally, they will reflect on how they evaluate a text and its impact on student learning. 
 
Mandy Burton teaches computer science ethics at the University of Illinois at Chicago. Lisa Landoe Hedrick is a Divinity School Teaching Fellow in the Divinity School and the College. Richard Miller is Professor of Religious Ethics at the Divinity School. Adam Sonderberg is Manager of the Seminary Co-Op Bookstore.

Coffee will be served.

[introductory workshop / arts of teaching] 

 

Inclusive Pedagogy for Religious Studies

  

Prof. Jill DeTemple, Southern Methodist University

Friday, February 14  |  9:30am - 11:30am
Swift Hall Common Room


Professor Jill DeTemple will lead a workshop on the dialogic classroom. The dialogic classroom refers to her pedagogical method of engaging difference with intellectual humility. In the religious studies classroom, DeTemple facilitates this pedagogical method by welcoming students from interdisciplinary backgrounds, balancing critical thinking with constructive thinking, and developing mutual understanding. After describing the dialogic classroom, DeTemple will train participants to set-up communication agreements in their own classrooms.
 
Jill DeTemple is the Associate Professor and Director of Undergraduate Studies in the Department of Religious Studies at Southern Methodist University. In 2018, she received the Excellence in Teaching Award from the AAR for her research project called “The Dialogic Classroom: A Pedagogy for Engaging Difference with Intellectual Humility,” which is co-funded by the University of Connecticut and the Templeton Foundation.

Breakfast will be served. 

[advanced workshop / dean's seminar] 
 

Identity and Intersectionality in the Religious Studies Course

Inclusive Pedagogy Fellows

Friday, March 6  |  11am - 1pm
Swift Hall 106


The Inclusive Pedagogy Fellows will lead a two-part conversation on identity in the religious studies classroom. The first part will focus on issues of race and ethnicity, using texts by bell hooks, Kimberly Tanner, and other researchers of the minority gap and prejudice in higher education. The second part will focus on feminism and intersectionality, using texts by bell hooks and researchers of socio-belonging interventions in higher education.
 
The Inclusive Pedagogy Fellows are a select group of Divinity School PhD students working together to learn best practices for teaching college students. Their work is funded by the Provost’s office and the Divinity School’s Craft of Teaching program. 

Lunch will be served.


[introductory workshop / elective]