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May 8, 2003
In a recent Sightings (April 3), Professor W. Clark Gilpin writes, “It is frequently the case in myth and religious narrative that things are not what they seem. Strangers, animals, even plants, turn out to be gods.” There are plenty of cases in our modern world in which the opposite is true, namely, that gods turn out to be strangers, animals, or even plants.
May 5, 2003
Now that the U.S. proposal, or "road map," for Israel-Palestine futures is unfolding, most columnists, when they discuss American Jews, concentrate on highly-placed figures in the Bush administration. Some Jewish columnists also talk about the nature of the support the administration gets from one element of the Christian right, a "core constituency" of our governmental leaders.
May 1, 2003
The Religion and Values department at Gallup recently initiated a new index called the "Gallup Religious Tolerance Index," which will now be part of Gallup's regular polling. To publicize this new initiative, Gallup organized an on-line seminar led by Al Winseman who described the format of the new index and some preliminary findings.
April 28, 2003
Call this column "Exclusion II." We can't answer your e-mail responses, though we welcome them and learn from them. And we rarely repeat attention to a topic, since there are so many objects of our "sightings" out there to treat.
April 24, 2003
Perhaps no one still believes that photographs exhibit unadulterated reality. Photos, we know, are subject to any number of editorial, compositional, and other strategic effects that might be used not to display reality, but to convey ideology under the guise of factual appearance. That said, photographs nonetheless exhibit a kind of evidential quality.

Author: Jeremy Biles
April 21, 2003
"Exclusion," Carl Sandburg once said, was the ugliest word in the English language. Two kinds of exclusion appear in the sightings we do every week. It's important to keep them apart.
April 17, 2003
I admit to being a bit offended by the U.S. military's use of the words shock and awe to describe the bombing campaign which began the war with Iraq. Not shock so much, since obviously the stunning effect of explosives is part of the process of defeating an enemy. The ones who are not killed by the blast are demoralized by its shocking force.
April 14, 2003
Five days in Paris left me and the entire Marty-Party (five of us) refreshed, thanks to our attendance of Bach’s St. Matthew Passion, conducted by friend John Nelson at the Cathedral of Notre Dame. We cannot profess expertise about what the “French” are thinking about our war, because these were days off from work and days on pilgrimage -- not a time for poll- or pulse-taking.
April 10, 2003
In "The Varieties of Wounding Experience [Sightings, February 27]," Jeremy Biles, drawing on William James, asserts that wounds strike us from a place prior to logic and outside the limits of our control.
April 7, 2003
A policy statement from your Monday morning contributor to Sightings: we are not going to talk about religion-and-the-war every week. There is plenty to talk about, and we won't close our eyes and ears to it. Note: this is not opting out for commercial reasons; we are a freebie. CBS, in The Wall Street Journal (April 3), finds that war coverage has reached "a bit of a saturation point ...

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