Course Archive Winter 2013

BIBL 31312 Seminar: Philosophy in the Early Roman Empire

Asmis, Elizabeth

M 1:30-4:20 ARR

Philosophy in the early Roman empire takes many different directions. But there is a common basis, and that is a concern with leading one's life. In this course, we will focus on practical ethics, in particular one's relations with others. How does one deal with the emperor and other superiors? How does one deal with social inferiors, including those at the very bottom of the social scale, slaves? How does one deal with friends? In all those relations, how does one preserve one's integrity? We will read selections from Seneca, Epictetus, Marcus Aurelius, and others. Knowledge of Greek and Latin is helpful, but is not required.

Ident. CLAS 32312

BIBL 32500 Introduction to the New Testament: Texts and Contexts

Klauck, Hans-Josef

T/TH 10:30-11:50 S106

A close interaction with the texts of the New Testament with the following goals in mind:

  1. Through careful reading to come to know well some representative pieces of this literature;
  2. To gain some knowledge of the historical, geographic, social, religious, cultural, and political contexts of these texts and the events they relate to;
  3. To learn the major literary genres represented in the canon ("gospels," "acts," "letters," and "apocalypses");
  4. To comprehend the various theological visions to which these texts give expression;
  5. To situate oneself in the history of research, and to reflect on the goals and methods of interpretation;
  6. To raise questions for further study.

Discussion groups will meet Thursdays and Fridays from 12:00-1:00 in Swift 208. A third discussion group to be arranged.

Ident. RLST 12000/FNDL 28202

BIBL 34000 Introductory Biblical Hebrew 2

Mastnjak, Nathan

M/W/F 8:00-8:50 S201

PQ: BIBL 33900.

BIBL 35300 Introductory Koine Greek 2

Den Dulk, Matthijs

M/W/F 8:00-8:50 S208

PQ: BIBL 35100

BIBL 47500 The Apostolic Fathers

Martinez, David

M/W 9:00-10:20 S201

An intensive reading of the Greek text of the Didache, I Clement, and all the Ignatian Epistles. The course will focus on the Greek style of each author, their historical, and social context, and the sources and nature of their thought. We will also seek to understand the position of these early Christian thinkers within the important continuum between the canonical New Testament writings (of which some of their works were a part in certain mss traditions) and the doctrinal controversies of the fourth century.
PQ: at least 2 years of Greek.

Idents.GREK 25700/35700

BIBL 55000 Literary Features of Biblical Composition

Chavel, Simeon

Tu 1:30-4:20 S200

Critical survey of compositional features of the literature of the Hebrew Bible, in narrative and non-narrative texts, prose and poetry. Mix of primary analysis and secondary reading. Will engage literary theory. Regular class presentations and participation. One final paper (25-30pp.).

PQ: 2 years of Biblical Hebrew.

BIBL 55300 Exodus 19-25

Chavel, Simeon

TH 1:30-4:20 S403

Seminar on the "historical myth" of divine appearance and lawgiving to Israel. Will engage variety of disciplines (compositional history, manuscript traditions, literary analysis, legal analysis, theory of religion, archaeology, political and social history). Responsibilities include primary and secondary reading, class-time presentation, and two papers (midterm 10pp. and final 25 pp.).

PQ: Biblical Hebrew and Greek.

BIBL 55600 John Chrysostom, Biblical Interpreter

Mitchell, Margaret

W 6:30-9:20 S403

Presbyter at Antioch and later bishop at Constantinople, John (ca. 347-407) was one of the most famous preachers of Christian antiquity (hence the sobriquet, "The Golden Mouth''). This course will be devoted to readings within a collection of his sermons on passages in the Pauline letters that have not been translated into a modern language. Attention will be paid to how he conceives of the task of interpretation, how his own rhetorical goals are advanced through his exegetical choices, and the degree to which a strict dichotomy between "Antiochene" and "Alexandrine" schools of interpretation can be sustained.

PQ: strong Greek skills

Ident. HCHR 55600

THEO 30100 History of Christian Thought I

Otten, Willemein

M 9:00-11:50 S106

This first course in the History of Christian Thought sequence deals with the post New Testament period until Augustine, stretching roughly from 150 through 450CE. The aim of the course is to follow the development of Christian thought by relating its structural features to the historical context in which they arose without adhering to schematic models such as East vs. West, orthodoxy vs. heresy, Alexandrian vs. Antiochene exegesis. The following authors and themes will be analyzed and discussed:

  1. Martyrdom and the Authority of Christian Witness: Ignatius of Antioch, Justin Martyr
  2. Platonism and Exegesis: Philo and Origen
  3. Incarnation and Asceticism: Athanasius, Gregory of Nyssa
  4. Ecclesial Unity and Episcopal Authority: Cyprian, Ambrose and Chrysostom
  5. Projecting Historical Authority: Eusebius and Jerome
  6. Normative Belief and Gnostic Dissent: All About the Creeds
  7. Ancient Thought Baptized: Augustine of Hippo

Ident. HCHR 30100

THEO 30300 History of Christian Thought 3

Schreiner, Susan

T/TH 3:00-4:20 S106

This course covers the early modern era from the 14th through the 16th century. The emphasis is on intellectual history, particularly that of the reformation and the Council of Trent. The course includes readings from 14th century mystics and late-medieval dissidents such as John Hus, Luther, Zwingli and Calvin, as well as Ignatius of Loyola and the Council of Trent.

Ident. HCHR 30300

THEO 31100 History of Theological Ethics I

Schweiker, William

T/TH 9:00-10:20 S106

This is the first part of a two part history.  It is conducted through the study of basic, classic texts. The course moves from the philosophical ethics of the Greek and Roman worlds through strands of Hebrew scripture, the origins of the Christian movement, the end of the Roman age to the emergence of Islam, and, finally, Christian and Jewish scholastic and mystical thought in the Western middle ages. While the golden thread of the history is the origin and differentiation of Christian moral thinking, this is set within and compared with the complexity of traditions (Hellenistic philosophical, Jewish, Islamic) that intersect and often collide throughout these formative century in Western thought. In this way, the exploration of one tradition opens onto rich comparative thinking. The course proceeds by lectures and discussion. Most readings are in translation. There will be a final examination.  This is a basic course and thus no previous work in theology, philosophy, or ethics is required.

Ident. RETH 31100

THEO 43501 Contemporary Models of Theology

Hopkins, Dwight

W 1:30-4:20 S200

This course compares and contrasts various systems and methods in contemporary theology. By contemporary, we mean theological developments in the USA from the late 1960s to the present. Specifically, we reflect critically on the following models: progressive liberal, post-liberal, feminist, womanist. We are especially interested in how these theological paradigms engage the notion of being human.

THEO 46110 Race, Gender and African American Religions

Butler, Lee

Tu 3:00-5:50 S403

As a formative influence in the development of the Atlantic World, religion has been a defining force for determining human social intercourse. With definitions of humanity at the center of the construction of the Atlantic World, the religions of the Americas shaped what it means to be African American. Framing course analyses and reflections within the psychology of religion, we will explore African American identity formation and the impact of religions on African American constructions of race and gender. This will include conversations on the ways African American religions—both African-derived and Christian-influenced traditions—have encouraged or inhibited resistance to domination.

Ident. CHRM 46110 / RAME 46110

THEO 53600 Evil: Myth, Symbol and Reality

Schweiker, William

W 6:00-8:50 S208

This seminar is for advanced students (at least 2 graduate level courses in constructive studies to enroll). The seminar will explore the problem of evil on three registers of reflection: myth, symbol, and reality. Primary texts include (among others) Martin Buber, Good and Evil; Arthur Cohen, The Tremendum; Immanuel Kant, Religion Within the Limits of Reason Alone; and Paul Ricoeur, The Symbolism of Evil. Seminar presentation and research paper required.

Ident. RETH 53600

CHRM 30600 Introduction to the Study of Ministry: Colloquium

Lindner, Cynthia and Boyd, Kevin

W 1:30-2:50 S400

This year-long integration seminar grounds first year M.Div. students in habits and perspectives essential to the practice of ministry. Students will cultivate the discipline of attention--learning to read closely, to listen deeply, to interrogate their experience, and to participate in rigorous critical conversation. During the first quarter, students will explore the relationship of narrative and theology; the second quarter will engage students in a close encounter with urban ministry; during the third quarter, students will integrate tradition, reason, and experience as they articulate definitions of ministry.

DO NOT REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

CHRM 32500 Theology in the Public Square

Culp, Kristine

T/TH 1:30-2:50 S400

This course explores themes in "public theology" as formulated by Martin Luther King, Jr., Reinhold Niebuhr, Dorothy Day, and Abraham Joshua Heschel, and in relation to selected contemporary cultural contexts.

Required of first year M.DIV. students.

CHRM 35200 Arts of Ministry: Pastoral Care and Counseling

Lindner, Cynthia

F 9:00-11:50 S400

This course is the second of a three-quarter sequence introducing students to essential aspects of religious leadership; the sequence is required for second-year MDiv students and complements their field education experience. During this quarter students focus on religious communities' practices of healing, reconciling, and empowerment, investigating the broad scope of human experience using the lenses of theology, ethics and the social sciences, and cultivating practices of care such as attention, accompaniment, and moral guidance.

CHRM 40700 Practice of Ministry II

Boyd, Kevin

F 1:30-3:30 S400

DO NOT REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

CHRM 42800 Senior Ministry Thesis Seminar

Lindner, Cynthia and Rosengarten, Richard

W 3:00-5:50 S400

Required seminar for M.DIV. students in the year in which they are writing and presenting their theses.

CHRM 43000 Dying in the Modern World

Boyd, Kevin

M 3:00-5:50 S201

This will be an interdisciplinary class team taught by faculty from the Divinity School and the Medical School that will draw students from both schools. This class will explore the experiential, psychological, clinical, and theological dimensions of death and dying. The primary focus of this class will be the death experience from a modern, Western point of view. We are first and foremost concerned, as care-giving professionals, with the experience of dying as we encounter it in our most immediate context. The class will offer a very brief historical overview of social attitudes about death, but our primary emphasis will be on the shifts and changes of the last 50 years in how Americans think about dying.

Ident. PEDS 43000

CHRM 46110 Race, Gender and African American Religions

Butler, Lee

Tu 3:00-5:50 S403

As a formative influence in the development of the Atlantic World, religion has been a defining force for determining human social intercourse. With definitions of humanity at the center of the construction of the Atlantic World, the religions of the Americas shaped what it means to be African American. Framing course analyses and reflections within the psychology of religion, we will explore African American identity formation and the impact of religions on African American constructions of race and gender. This will include conversations on the ways African American religions—both African-derived and Christian-influenced traditions—have encouraged or inhibited resistance to domination.

Ident. THEO 46110 / RAME 46110

 AASR 43800 Modern Enchantments: The Occult, the Paranormal, and the Extraterrestrial

Doostdar, Alireza

W 1:30-4:20 S201

Max Weber famously declared that the fate of modern society was marked by the "disenchantment of the world." For more than two decades, anthropologists have been proving him wrong: not only have beliefs in the supernatural remained stubbornly influential in ordering peoples' worldly experiences in industrial societies, there is growing recognition of the enchantment and magicality that constitutes modern life itself. We examine spirit possession, magic, witchcraft, alien abductions, and other occult and paranormal phenomena in relation to the sites most intimately associated with modernity's rationality and progress: the market, science and technology, and the state.

DVPR 30201 Indian Philosophy l

Kapstein, Matthew

T/TH 10:30-11:50 S200

Ident. HREL 30200/SALC 30901

DVPR 33800 Theory of Reference

Stern, Josef

M/W/F 10:30-11:20 ARR

This course is a survey of recent theories of names, descriptions, and truth. We discuss the relation of reference to meaning, as well as the epistemological and metaphysical consequences drawn from theses about reference. After briefly reviewing classical sources (e.g., Frege, Russell, Tarski), we concentrate on current work by Searle, Kripke, Donnellan, Kaplan, Putnam, Evans, Davidson, and Burge.

PQ: PHIL 30000 or equivalent required; prior exposure to analytic philosophy recommended.

Ident. PHIL 33801

DVPR 35111 Judaism and Philosophy of Religion in Contemporary Thought

Davidson, Arnold

T/TH 10:30-11:20 ARR

How do distinctive elements in the Jewish tradition contribute to more general issues in the philosophy of religion? We will approach this question through a study of three major twentieth-century Jewish thinkers: Joseph Soloveitchik, Yeshayahu Leibowitz and Emmanuel Levinas. Topics to be discussed include the role of practice in religion, the nature of faith, the relations between ethics and law and between religion and politics, prayer and divine service, the status of tradition and sacred texts. Attention will be given to debates within the Jewish tradition and to the framework of philosophical and theological issues that characterizes contemporary thought. 

Priority will be given to students with reading knowledge of French. The course will alternate between lectures and discussions.

Graduate students interested in taking for credit should attend 1st seminar before registering.

Ident. HIJD 35111/PHIL 25111/35111

DVPR 53401 Yogacara in the Indian Philosophical Tradition

Kapstein, Matthew

M 3:00-5:50 S403

Ident. HREL 53401

ISLM 35808 Shi'ism, Messianism and Violence in Islamic History

Gleave, Robert

T 9:00-11:50 ARR

Ident. HIST 35808

ISLM 40500 Readings in the Text of the Qur'an

Sells, Michael

T 1:30-4:20 MMC Library

Intensive readings in the Arabic text of the Qur'an. We focus on reading the Qur'anic text closely, with attention to grammar, syntax, recitation protocols, vocabulary, parables, symbols, figures of speech, rhetoric, changes in voice and person, allusions to parallel Qur'anic passages, and theology. Classical and modern commentaries are consulted, but the primary emphasis is on the Qur'anic text itself. The winter 2013 course will focus upon suras attributed to the Meccan period of Muhammad's prophetic career, particularly those such as suras 52, 53, 55, and 56 that take up the theme of the garden. Students may well have different levels of Arabic; the course does not make Arabic proficiency into a matter of evaluation, but encourages each participant to work at his or her level.

PQ:2 years of Arabic or equivalent.

Ident. NELC 40601, CMES 40500

ISLM 45401 Aristotle in the Middle Ages

Robinson, James

M 1:30-4:20 S200

An introduction Aristotle as he was known in the Middle Ages. The course will survey the Aristotelian corpus and the commentaries on it, along with the many secondary adaptations and summaries of it. The biographical tradition about Aristotle (and his relationship with Alexander and Plato) will also be examined, as will the large pseudepigraphical literature attributed to him, especially in the occult. There will be a section for Arabists to read texts in Arabic, a section for Hebraists to read texts in Hebrew.

Ident. HIJD 45401

ISLM 46401 Introduction to Judaeo-Arabic Literature and Thought

Robinson, James

W 1:30-4:20 S403

An introduction to the culture of the Jews living in the medieval Islamic world. The survey will begin with discussion of Judaeo-Arabic itself -- a form of middle Arabic generally written in Hebrew characters. It will then focus on the literary corpus produced in Judaeo-Arabic: translations of the Bible and commentaries on the Bible; works of philosophy, theology, and mysticism; literary texts and legal tracts. The students will also be exposed to the vast array of documents surviving in the Cairo Genizah and other genizot.

Ident. HIJD 46401, CMES 46401

HIJD 35111 Judaism and Philosophy of Religion in Contemporary Thought

Davidson, Arnold

T/TH 10:30-11:20 ARR

How do distinctive elements in the Jewish tradition contribute to more general issues in the philosophy of religion? We will approach this question through a study of three major twentieth-century Jewish thinkers: Joseph Soloveitchik, Yeshayahu Leibowitz and Emmanuel Levinas. Topics to be discussed include the role of practice in religion, the nature of faith, the relations between ethics and law and between religion and politics, prayer and divine service, the status of tradition and sacred texts. Attention will be given both to debates within the Jewish tradition and to the framework of philosophical and theological issues that characterizes contemporary thought.

Priority will be given to students with reading knowledge of French. The course will alternate between lectures and discussions.
Graduate students interested in taking for credit should attend 1st seminar before registering.

Ident. DVPR 35111/PHIL 25111/35111

HIJD 36100 Philosophical Interpretation of Scripture in the Middle Ages

Stern, Josef

M/W 1:30-2:59 ARR

An important genre of philosophical writing during the Middle Ages was the commentary, both commentaries of canonical philosophical works (e.g., Aristotle) and on Scripture. This course is an introduction to medieval philosophical exegesis of Scripture, concentrating on the Book of Job and the philosophical problems of evil and suffering. Authors will include Saadiah, Maimonides, and Aquinas, and readings will include both their commentaries on Job and their systematic philosophical discussions of the problems of evil.

Ident. PHIL 26100/36100/JWSG 26250/RLST 25902

HIJD 45101 History and Memory in Jewish Thought

Mendes-Flohr, Paul

TH 3:00-5:50 S200

We will consider the place of history in Jewish thought from the perspective of the concept of mnemohistory, history as remembered. Through the prism of this concept we will examine liturgical memory, collective memory, cultural memory, and historiographical and ideological constructions of memory, the problem of representation of the past; the politics of commemoration.

HIJD 45401 Aristotle in the Middle Ages

Robinson, James

M 1:30-4:30 S200

An introduction Aristotle as he was known in the Middle Ages. The course will survey the Aristotelian corpus and the commentaries on it, along with the many secondary adaptations and summaries of it. The biographical tradition about Aristotle (and his relationship with Alexander and Plato) will also be examined, as will the large pseudepigraphical literature attributed to him, especially in the occult. There will be a section for Arabists to read texts in Arabic, a section for Hebraists to read texts in Hebrew.

Ident. ISLM 45401

HIJD 46401 Introduction to Judaeo-Arabic Literature and Thought

Robinson

W 1:30-4:20 S403

An introduction to the culture of the Jews living in the medieval Islamic world. The survey will begin with discussion of Judaeo-Arabic itself -- a form of middle Arabic generally written in Hebrew characters. It will then focus on the literary corpus produced in Judaeo-Arabic: translations of the Bible and commentaries on the Bible; works of philosophy, theology, and mysticism; literary texts and legal tracts. The students will also be exposed to the vast array of documents surviving in the Cairo Genizah and other genizot.

Ident. ISLM 46401, CMES 46401

HIJD 47600 Gershom Scholem: Theologian and Social Critic

Mendes-Flohr, Paul

W 6:30-9:20 S200

With the ultimate objective of determining whether Scholem's scholarship on mysticism and antinomianism reflects a theological agenda, we will examine his diaries, memoirs, correspondence, especially with Walter Benjamin on how to read Kafka, Zionism, his poetry and occasional essays on theology.

HIJD 50002 Seminar: Major Problems in Modern Jewish Thought 2

Wasserstein, Bernard

F 9:30-12:20 ARR

The second part of this course will be devoted to the preparation of a major research paper.

Ident. HIST 78302/NEHC 30422

HCHR 30100 History of Christian Thought I

Otten, Willemein

M 9:00-11:50 S106

This first course in the History of Christian Thought sequence deals with the post New Testament period until Augustine, stretching roughly from 150 through 450CE. The aim of the course is to follow the development of Christian thought by relating its structural features to the historical context in which they arose without adhering to schematic models such as East vs. West, orthodoxy vs. heresy, Alexandrian vs. Antiochene exegesis. The following authors and themes will be analyzed and discussed:

  1. Martyrdom and the Authority of Christian Witness: Ignatius of Antioch, Justin Martyr
  2. Platonism and Exegesis: Philo and Origen
  3. Incarnation and Asceticism: Athanasius, Gregory of Nyssa
  4. Ecclesial Unity and Episcopal Authority: Cyprian, Ambrose and Chrysostom
  5. Projecting Historical Authority: Eusebius and Jerome
  6. Normative Belief and Gnostic Dissent: All About the Creeds
  7. Ancient Thought Baptized: Augustine of Hippo

Ident. THEO 30100

HCHR 30300 History of Christian Thought 3

Schreiner, Susan

T/TH 3:00-4:20 S106

This course covers the early modern era from the 14th through the 16th century. The emphasis is on intellectual history, particularly that of the reformation and the Council of Trent. The course includes readings from 14th century mystics and late-medieval dissidents such as John Hus, Luther, Zwingli and Calvin, as well as Ignatius of Loyola and the Council of Trent. 

Ident. THEO 30300

HCHR 41401 Gender, Power and Religion in Medieval Europe (800-1100)

Pick, Lucy

Tu 9:00-11:50 S400

This course will examine the intersection of religious and secular power and the way these were reflected in and shaped by the gender systems of early medieval Europe. Topics to be studied include Kantorowicz's notion of "the king's two bodies," royal men and women, women and memorial culture, lineage and gender, marriage, and monastic culture. We will examine the Carolingian world and its aftermath, Ottonian Germany, Anglo-Saxon England, Hungary, and the early Spanish kingdoms.

Ident. HIST 42701, GNDR 41400

HCHR 42600 The American Religious Historical Canon

Brekus, Catherine

T 1:30-4:20 S201

This course examines traditional narratives of American religious history. Beginning with Robert Baird'sReligion in America (1842), and concluding with Mark Noll's A History of Christianity in the United States and Canada (1992), we will trace how scholars have imagined the whole "plot" of American religious history. We will focus particularly on how narratives have changed over time. Students are required to make a class presentation and to write one 20-25 page paper.

Ident. RAME 42600/HIST 63702

HCHR 55600 John Chrysostom, Biblical Interpreter

Mitchell, Margaret

W 6:30-9:20 S403

Presbyter at Antioch and later bishop at Constantinople, John (ca. 347-407) was one of the most famous preachers of Christian antiquity (hence the sobriquet, "The Golden Mouth''). This course will be devoted to readings within a collection of his sermons on passages in the Pauline letters that have not been translated into a modern language. Attention will be paid to how he conceives of the task of interpretation, how his own rhetorical goals are advanced through his exegetical choices, and the degree to which a strict dichotomy between "Antiochene" and "Alexandrine" schools of interpretation can be sustained.

PQ: strong Greek skills

Ident. BIBL 55600

RAME 42600 The American Religious Historical Canon

Brekus, Catherine

T 1:30-4:20 S201

This course examines traditional narratives of American religious h8istory. Beginning with Robert Baird'sReligion in America (1842), and concluding with Mark Noll's A History of Christianity in the United States and Canada (1992), we will trace how scholars have imagined the whole "plot" of American religious history. We will focus particularly on how narratives have changed over time. Students are required to make a class presentation and to write one 20-25 page paper.

Ident. HCHR 42600/HIST 63702

RAME 46110 Race, Gender and African American Religions

Butler, Lee

Tu 3:00-5:50 S403

As a formative influence in the development of the Atlantic World, religion has been a defining force for determining human social intercourse. With definitions of humanity at the center of the construction of the Atlantic World, the religions of the Americas shaped what it means to be African American. Framing course analyses and reflections within the psychology of religion, we will explore African American identity formation and the impact of religions on African American constructions of race and gender. This will include conversations on the ways African American religions—both African-derived and Christian-influenced traditions—have encouraged or inhibited resistance to domination.

Ident. CHRM 46110 / THEO 46110

HREL 30200 Indian Philosophy l

Kapstein, Matthew

T/TH 10:30-11:50 S200

Ident. DVPR 30201/SALC 30901

HREL 35000 Mahabharata in English Translation

Doniger,Wendy

W/F 1:30-2:50 S208

A reading of the Mahabharata in English translation (John Smith, van Buitenen, Narasimhan, P.C. Roy, and Doniger [ms], with special attention to issues of mythology, feminism and theodicy. 15-20 page paper at the end of the course.

Ident. SALC 20400/48200/FNDL 24400/RLST 26800/SCTH 32201

HREL 36000 Second Year Sanskrit: Readings in the Mahabharata

Doniger, Wendy

T/TH 1:30-2:50 S207

Readings in the Book 3 of the Mahabharata, Nala

PQ: One year of Sanskrit. Exam at the end of the quarter.

Ident. SALC 48400

HREL 41100 Readings in the History of Religions: the 'Chicago School'

Wedemeyer, Christian

M 1:30-4:20 MEM Library

This course will be devoted primarily to the close, critical reading of some representative works of the two most famous names associated with the History of Religions at the University of Chicago: Joachim Wach and Mircea Eliade. Close attention will be paid to Wach's Habilitation thesis, entitledReligionswissenschaft, his Sociology of Religion, and several of his essays. We will also read and discuss programmatical essays of Eliade, his Myth of the Eternal Return and Patterns in Comparative Religion. A selection of critical and interpretative essays will supplement these core texts, as we attempt to unpack and contextualize their arguments. We will also look briefly at a few programmatic essays on the discipline by some subsequent representatives of this tradition, such as Joseph Kitagawa, Charles Long, and Jonathan Smith.

PQ: HREL 32900: Clasical Theories of Religion or equivalent.

HREL 44610 Rituals of Sacrifice

Lincoln, Bruce

M/W 10:00-11:20 S200

Ident. ANTH 42435

HREL 53401 Yogacara in the Indian Philosophical Tradition

Kapstein, Matthew

M 3:00-5:50 S403


Ident. DVPR 53401

RLIT 36300 Renaissance Epic

Murrin, Michael

M/W 1:30-2:50 ARR

A study of classical epic in the Renaissance or Early Modern period. Emphasis will be both on texts and on classical epic theory. We will read Tasso's Jerusalem Delivered, Camoes' Lusiads, and Milton's Paradise Lost. A paper will be required and perhaps an examination

Ident. ENGL 36300/CMLT 39100

 RLIT 50900 History of Criticism II

Rosengarten, Richard

F 1:00-4:20 S403

An advanced, intensive seminar on major texts and themes of interpretive theory, from iconoclasm controversy through Sir Philip Sydney. Continues the work in autumn quarter of History of Criticism I.

PQ: Approval of a Ph.D., course of study petition that includes the Religion and Literature 1 qualifying examination, or permission of instructor.

RETH 31100 History of Theological Ethics I

Schweiker, William

T/TH 9::00-10:20 S106

This is the first part of a two part history. It is conducted through the study of basic, classic texts. The course moves from the philosophical ethics of the Greek and Roman worlds through strands of Hebrew scripture, the origins of the Christian movement, the end of the Roman age to the emergence of Islam, and, finally, Christian and Jewish scholastic and mystical thought in the Western middle ages. While the golden thread of the history is the origin and differentiation of Christian moral thinking, this is set within and compared with the complexity of traditions (Hellenistic philosophical, Jewish, Islamic) that intersect and often collide throughout these formative century in Western thought. In this way, the exploration of one tradition opens onto rich comparative thinking. The course proceeds by lectures and discussion. Most readings are in translation. There will be a final examination. This is a basic course and thus no previous work in theology, philosophy, or ethics is required.

Ident. THEO 31100

RETH 40300 The Ethics of Albert Camus

Elshtain, Jean

T 1:00-3:50 S208

PQ: Must have completed two courses with Prof. Elshtain or permission of instructor.

Ident. PLSC 40300

RETH 43900 Religion and Democracy

Gamwell, Franklin

TH 1:00-3:50 S208

An examination of legal, philosophical, and theological views on the proper role of religious beliefs and religious communities within a democratic political process, with focus on contemporary United States politics. Attention to the thought of John Courtney Murray, John Rawls, and Jeffrey Stout, among others.

RETH 50201 Religion and the Political Order

Elshtain, Jean

M 1:00-3:50 S208

An advanced introduction to basic ordering concepts in the study of social and political ethics. We will explore the underlying presuppositions that frame each thinker's perspective and that bear directly or indirectly on political and social life. Special attention will be paid to the theorist's understanding of the role of religion in public life. Readings from Plato, Aristotle, Augustine, Aquinas, Luther, Calvin, Machiavelli, Hobbes, Locke, Rousseau, Hegel, Mill.

Ident. PLSC 50201

RETH 51404 Global Inequality

Nussbaum, Martha/Weisbach, David

W 4:00-6:00 LBQ-B

Global income and wealth are highly concentrated. The richest 2% of the population own about half of the global assets. Per capita income in the United States is around $47,000 and in Europe it is around $30,500, while in India it is $3,400 and in Congo it is $329. There are equally unsettling iinequalities in longevity, health, and education.

In this class, we ask what duties nations and individuals have to address these inequalities and what are the best strategies for doing so. What role must each country play in helping itself? What is the role of international agreements and agencies, of NGOs, and of corporations in addressing global poverty? How do we weigh policies that emphasize growth against policies that emphasize within-country equality, health, or education?

In seeking answers to these questions, the class will combine readings on the law and economics of global development with readings on the philosophy of global justice. A particular focus will be on the role that legal institutions, both domestic and international, play in discharging these duties. For, example, we might focus on how a nation with natural resources can design legal institutions to ensure they are exploited for the benefit of the citizens of the country.

Students will be assess via a substantial research paper and class participation. Non-law students are welcome but need permission of the instructors, since space is limited.

Ident. LAWS 92403, PHIL 51404, PLSC 51404.

RETH 53600 Evil: Myth, Symbol, Reality

Schweiker, William

W 6:00-8:50 S208

This seminar is for advanced students (at least 2 graduate level courses in constructive studies to enroll). The seminar will explore the problem of evil on three registers of reflection: myth, symbol, and reality.

Primary texts include (among others) Martin Buber, Good and Evil; Arthus Cohen, The Tremendum; Immanuel Kant, Religion Within the Limits of Reason Alone; and Paul Ricoeur, The Symbolism of Evil.

Seminar presentation and research paper required.

Ident. THEO 53600