Course Archive Spring 2013

BIBL 36912 Septuagint Greek

Torallas, Sofia

T/Th 9:00-10:20 CL 021

This course is aimed at students who have a working knowledge of Greek Grammar. The course will provide an overview of both the linguistic aspects of the language of the Greek Old Testament, and the social and literary context within which the text was produced. We will cover text-critical questions; the general phenomenon of "translation Greek" and the specific processes of translation of the LXX; subsequent translations of the text; textual transmission from the papyrus codex to the medieval witnesses; particularities of the Greek language in Egypt; and the history of the society that produced the translation, the Jewish community of Alexandria. Close reading will focus on the Pentateuch, with select passages from other books.

Ident. HIJD 36912, HCHR 36912, CLAS 36912

BIBL 37212 Jews and Christians in Egypt

Torallas, Sofia

T/Th 12:00-1:20 CL 021

This course will be taught with texts in translation and does not require any knowledge of Greek. It will begin by covering the history of the Jews in Egypt from the earliest Elephantine garrison to the scarce evidence for their survival beyond the reign of Hadrian. Drawing on literary and documentary texts from the Ptolemaic and Roman periods, we will approach topics such as political representation, legal issues, animal sacrifice and onomastics and identity. We will then turn to the earliest stage of Christianity in Egypt, with special focus on the birth of monasticism, again drawing on literary and documentary texts.

Ident. HIJD 37212/HCHR 37212, CLAS 37212

BIBL 42000 The Gospel According to Mark

Mitchell, Margaret

W 6:00-8:50 S208

This course, through close reading of the Greek text, will investigate the composition, genre, plot structure, theology, purpose and impact of the first Christian narrative text. Particular emphases include the relationship between Mark and Paul, the place of the Gospel according to Mark in the formation of early Christian literary culture, and the hermeneutical question of Mark and media, ancient and modern.

PQ: At least 2 quarters of Greek; BIBL 32500 or equivalent.

BIBL 44400 Lucian of Samosata

Martinez, David

T/TH 10:30-11:50 S201

Lucian of Samosata (b. approx. AD 120), like many authors of the New Testament, wrote in Greek but was born and grew up in an Aramaic speaking community. His idiosyncratic literary output comprises around 80 prose pieces which reflect an engaging synthesis of comedy, satire, popular philosophy, and theological musing. Many of his works present a savvy commentary on his cultural and religious environment, and especially enjoyable is his mirthful abandon in identifying religious quackery and the victims of it. As one of the most important and prolific pagan authors of the early centuries AD, Lucian's works form an important background to the early Christian movement, both in his direct references to Christians (in the Peregrinus and Alexander) and in his sensitive description of the vast religious melange in which early Christianity grew. The class will focus on daily close reading and analysis of Lucian's Greek and discussion of his ideas. Our reading will include the treatises Lover of LiesAlexander the False Prophet, and the Death of Perigrinus. As time permits we will also read around in other works such as the Dialogues, the Eunuch, the Council of the Gods, and the "Munchausenesque" True History.

PQ: at least 2 years of Greek.

Ident. GREK 24000/34000

BIBL 44900 Paul's Letter to the Romans

Klauck, Hans-Josef

M/W 9:00-11:00 S208

The letter to the Romans is certainly one of the most influential texts of the New Testament. Melanchthon for example called it a "compendium theologiae christianae," a handbook of Christian theology, but he underestimated the importance of the historical context for the correct understanding of Romans. Why did Paul write to a community that he had not founded himself at all? What did he want to tell his addressees? And which genre, which type of letter, did he choose and adapt or even create? We will try to reconstruct the situation of the letter from chapter 1 and chapters 15-16. Then we will read and explain some of the key passages, especially in chapters 1-8. A separate Greek section will follow each class at 10:20-11:00
PQ: 2 quarters of the Koine Greek sequence.

BIBL 47300 Qohelet

Chavel, Simeon

T/TH 9:00-10:20 S400

Reading course. Will cover most of the book of Qohelet (Ecclesiastes). Student responsibilities include: preparing up to 25 verses ahead of every class, using standard critical tools; reading aloud, translating, and leading analysis in class; writing two exploratory papers (5 pp. each) and one exegetical paper (20 pp.); and doing some additional general reading.
PQ: One year of Biblical Hebrew

BIBL 51610 The Priestly History

Chavel, Simeon

TH 1:30-4:20 S403

Critical overview and analysis of the Priestly literature in the Hebrew Bible. Weekly preparation of primary text and secondary scholarship, in-class student presentation, and shared analysis of biblical text and modern hypotheses. Final paper (30 pp.)

PQ: 2 years of Biblical Hebrew.

THEO 30700 History of Christian Thought 5

Hector, Kevin

T/TH 1:30-2:50 S106

Ident. HCHR 30900

THEO 31200 History of Theological Ethics ll

Schweiker, William

T/TH 10:30-11:50 S106

This is the second part of a two part history. It is conducted through the study of basic, classic texts. The course begins with the tumultuous period of the Reformation and the Renaissance arising from the so-called Middle Ages and so attention to rebirth of classical thought, the plight of women in the medieval world, the interactions among Jews, Christians and Muslims, and the rise of cities and even nations. The course then moves into the emergence of distinctly "modern" forms of ethics in the "Enlightenment," through the romantic period and to the political, economic, and religious crises of the 20th century. The history ends with the emergence in the global field of the power interaction of the religions. While the golden thread of the history is the development and differentiation of Christian moral thinking, this is set within and compared with the complexity of traditions (philosophical, Jewish, Islamic) that intersect and often collide through centuries in Western thought. In this way, the exploration of one tradition opens onto rich comparative thinking. The course proceeds by lectures and discussion. Most readings are in translation. There will be a final examination. This is a basic course and thus no previous work in theology, philosophy, or ethics is required.

Ident. RETH 31200

THEO 31600 Introduction to Theology

Hector, Kevin

T/TH 9:00-10:20 S106

This course is designed to introduce students to the language, controversies and figures of theology, and to encourage students to improve their own theologizing by considering its public relevance, intelligibility, and justifiability.

THEO 36900 Phenomenon: From the Constitution of the Object to the Self-Manifestation of the Event: Kant, Husserl, Heidegger

Marion, Jean-Luc

M 3:00-5:50 S106

Ident. PHIL 36900/DVPR 36900

THEO 42000 Feminist Theology and Theory: Selected Texts

Culp, Kristine

T/TH 10:30-11:20 S200

This seminar will engage a close reading of Simone de Beauvoir's Le Deuxieme Sexe (1949) in English translation and in relation to selected feminist theologians. Beauvoir's attention to the situation and "situatedness" of women resulted in new ways of thinking about freedom, destiny, reciprocity, and subjectivity; it brought literature, autobiography, and cultural studies into philosophical reflection. We will examine how Beauvoir's text addressed mysticism and transcendence and consider the reception of Beauvoir's work in feminist theological reflection.

PQ: Some ability to work with the original French text is useful.

THEO 41300 Calvin's Institutes

Schreiner, Susan

T/TH 3:00-4:20 S208

Ident. HCHR 41700

THEO 42610 Theologies from the Underside of History

Hopkins, Dwight

W 1:30-4:20 S201

The origin of the concept of an international dialogue among theologians in Africa, Asia, and Latin America came from Abbe Oscar K. Bimwenyi, a Roman Catholic student from Zaire (Africa) studying theology in Louvain, Belgium in 1974. As a result of his vision and a preparatory committee composed of representatives from Africa, Asia, and Latin America, an organizing conference gave rise to the Ecumenical Dialogue of Third World Theologians (later Dialogue changed to Association) which took place in Dares Salaam, Tanzania in August 1976. Since that time, the Ecumenical Association of Third World Theologians (EATW01) has debated the theological and theoretical developments in contemporary theology on a global scale and from their own cultural contexts. This course will engage the varieties of theological and methodological commonalities and differences among these global theologies

THEO 45903 Christian and Anti-Christian: Kierkegaard and Nietzsche on Religion and Morality

Schweiker, William

T/TH 1:30-2:50 S208

This course explores major writings of Kierkegaard and Nietzsche on the relation between religion and morality. No previous knowledge or work in theology or ethics required. Course limited to 15 students. Course will include a close reading and discussion of the texts. Requirements include a final paper.

Ident. RETH 45903

THEO 46210 Diversa, sed non adverse: Religious Trends and Themes in the 12th Century

Otten, Willemein

M/W 10:00-11:20 S200

The twelfth century is traditionally known as a period of cultural renewal, a renaissance. In recent years there has been much more interest in the diversity and complexity of twelfth century developments: it is a period of schools and monasteries, of a vigorous debate between moderns (moderni) and ancients (antiqui), of religious change and new spiritualities, but also of a kind of melancholy, a criticism of learning, and of the first cracks in the convergence of theology and philosophy. The course will identify certain trends and themes and explore those through selected readings. Among the authors covered will be Peter Abelard, Bernard of Clairvaux, Hugh of St. Victor, Hildegard of Bingen, William of St. Thierry, and Alan of Lille.

Ident. HCHR 46210

THEO 51510 Seminar: Idolatry: Historical and Modern Perspectives

Schreiner, Susan

M 1:00-3:50 S200

This seminar examines the concept of idolatry as formulated in the Reformation disputes. We will analyze the way idolatry was understood by Luther, Calvin and Zwingli. We will also look at the occurrences of iconoclasm and religious violence in the 16th century; at the development of the concept of the modern ideas of idolatry, partly as a legacy of Francis Bacon; and at the view of idolatry in Karl Barth, Jacques Ellul and Nicholas Lash.

Ident. HCHR 51510

THEO 51610 Logos, Reason and Philosophy According to Tertullian

Marion, Jean Luc

W 3:00-5:50 S106

Ident. DVPR 51610/PHIL 53146

DVPR 30302 Indian Philosophy 2

Arnold, Dan

T/TH 10:30-11:50 S400

Ident. HREL 30300/RLST 24202/SALC 20902/30902

DVPR 36900 Phenomenon: From the Constitution of the Object to the Self-Manifestation of the Event: Kant, Husserl, Heidegger

Marion, Jean-Luc

M 3:00-5:50 S106

Ident. PHIL 36900/THEO 36900

DVPR 41700 Readings in Madhyamaka

Arnold, Don

F 1:00-3:50 S403

PQ: 2 years of Sanskrit or Tibetan

Ident. SALC 48317

DVPR 51610 Logos, Reason and Philosophy According to Tertullian

Marion, Jean-Luc

W 3:00-5:50 S106

Ident. THEO 51610/PHIL 53146

DVPR 57602 Autonomy: Kant's Conception of the Essence of Morality

Mueller, Anselm

Th 10:30-1:20 ARR

Autonomy: Kant¹s conception of the essence of morality. Autonomy is the centre of Kant¹s conception of morality. Hence we must try to understand the idea of self-legislation if we want to understand his moral theory, and examine its consistency and implications if we want to know whether an account of morality can be based on it. The course is to include discussion of the Categorical Imperative and of wider ethical questions regarding topics such as moral motivation, law and virtue. Students will participate by reading relevant texts, presenting brief comments on them, and joining in the discussion.

Ident. PHIL 57602

CHRM 30500 Introduction to the Study of Ministry: Colloquium

Lindner, Cynthia and Boyd, Kevin

W 1:30-2:50 S400

This year-long integration seminar grounds first year M.Div. students in habits and perspectives essential to the practice of ministry. Students will cultivate the discipline of attention--learning to read closely, to listen deeply, to interrogate their experience, and to participate in rigorous critical conversation. During the first quarter, students will explore the relationship of narrative and theology; the second quarter will engage students in a close encounter with urban ministry; during the third quarter, students will integrate tradition, reason, and experience as they articulate definitions of ministry.

DO NOT REGISTER FOR THIS COURSE

CHRM 35300 Arts of Ministry: Community, Leadership and Change

Lindner, Cynthia

F 9:00-11:50 S400

This course is the third of a three-quarter sequence introducing students to essential aspects of religious leadership; the sequence is required for second-year MDiv students and complements their field education experience. In this final quarter of the year-long sequence, students study congregations as "communities-within-communities," examining the public life of congregations and their leaders as responsible agents of change, both within the religious community and in the wider context. Through research projects and case studies, students practice the skills of analysis, decision-making, negotiation and visioning that are essential to organizational vitality and constructive community engagement.

CHRM 40800 The Practice of Ministry III

Boyd, Kevin

F 1:30-3:30 S400

CHRM 43400 Family Systems in Pastoral Practice

Boyd, Kevin

T/TH 9:00-10:20 S200

This course will use the lens of Family Systems theory to examine pastoral practice on both the larger community/congregational level as well as in the interpersonal pastoral care context. We will begin with the theoretical base, Friedman's Generation to Generation, and then move through several examples of film and literature (Richard Russo's Empire Falls and King Lear), before turning to current case-study examples drawn from student experience.

CHRM 50100 Prayer Patterns in the Abrahamic Religions

Foley, Edward

T 3:00-5:50 S200

AASR 33600 The Anthropology of Religion

Doostdar, Alireza

T 9:00-11:50 S208

A critical survey of some of the key theoretical issues in the anthropology of religion. Topics will include some or all of the following: Belief and skepticism, ritual action, semiotics and materiality, embodiment, ethical self-fashioning, and the politics of representation. Reading will consist of theoretical essay and ethnographies.

Ident. ISLM 33600

AASR 50087 Max Weber's Sociology of Religion

Joas, Hans

W 1:30-4:20 F505

Max Weber is perhaps the one undisputed classical figure in the discipline of sociology today. His reputation is to a large extent based on his historical and comparative studies of the "economic ethics" of the world religions and on the formulation of a systematic approach for the historical-sociological study of religion (in the relevant chapter of his Economy and Society). The seminar will start with a close reading of the religion chapter in Economy and Society and then continue with selections from his comparative studies. The focus of interest will not only be on Weber's theory, but also on the present state of research on the questions Weber was dealing with.

Ident. SOCI 50087/SCTH 50087

AASR 50088 Axiality, Evolution, and Modernity

Levine, Donald

ARR

This seminar will consider the current state of theoretical debate regarding two classic problematic notions in social theory–Evolution, and Modernity; how they relate to one another; and how both relate to the notion of Axiality as treated seminally in the latter writings of the late S. N. Eistenstald and in The Axial Age and its Consequences (2012) edited by Robert Bellah and Hans Joas. Highly recommended prerequisite: Familiarity with Max Weber's Sociology of Religion and/or participation in the course on that subject offered concurrently by Hans Joas. The seminar will meet once a week for 2 1/2 hours.

Ident. SOCI 50088

ISLM 30800 Sciences of the Qur'an

El Shamsy Ahmed

Tu 1:30-4:20 ARR

This course explores the various classical Islamic sciences that developed for the goals of understanding, reciting, and interpreting the Qur'an correctly. In the first part of the course we will cover an important textbook of the Qur'anic sciences from the Maluk era (al-Zarkashi's Burhan) in order to gain an introduction to the range of topics addressed by this field. The second part of the course consists of close reading of excerpts from three seminal Qur'an commentaries by Muqatil b. Sulayman (d. 150/767), al-Tabari (d. 310/923), and al-Razi (d. 606/1209), characterized by radically different approaches to the interpretation of the Qur'an.

PQ: 2 years of Arabic

Ident. NEHC 30800

ISLM 33600 The Anthropology of Religion

Doostdar, Alireza

T 9:00-11:50 S208

A critical survey of some of the key theoretical issues in the anthropology of religion. Topics will include some or all of the following: Belief and skepticism, ritual action, semiotics and materiality, embodiment, ethical self-fashioning, and the politics of representation. Reading will consist of theoretical essays and ethnographies.
Ident. AASR 33600

ISLM 40100 Islamic Love Poetry

Sells, Michael

Tu 1:30-4:20 MMC Library

The focus is on the pre-modern Islamic love lyric (nasib, ghazal). Since none of us know all the relevant languages, I ask each participant in the course to be a guide for a tradition for which he or she knows the language. We almost always devote sections to Arabic, Persian, Ottoman, and Urdu love lyric, and in the past, depending on the background and skills of the participants, we have read Bengali, Punjabi, Turkish, and Hindi poems. Other languages are possibility as well.
Prerequisite: ability to work in one of Islamicate languages, such as those mentioned above or an equivalent.

Ident. RLIT40300/NEHC 40600/CMLT 40100

ISLM 47110 Ibn Tufayl's Hayy b. Yaqzan

Robinson, James

M 1:30-4:20 S403

A study of Ibn Tufayl's classic twelfth-century philosophical/mystical romance, the story of a boy spontaneously generated on a desert island who achieves knowledge of God through empirical study of nature. There will be a section for Arabists to read the text in Arabic, and a section for Hebraists to read the medieval Hebrew translation with Moses Narboni's unpublished commentary on it.

Ident. HIJD 47110

ISLM 48610 Jewish Sufism

Robinson, James

Th 1:30-4:20 S400

During the Middle Ages the Jews in the Muslim world developed a robust synthesis of Jewish Spirituality and Islamic Sufism. Even those who did not subscribe to a Sufi pietistic Judaism nevertheless introduced Sufi language and ideas into their Jewish thought. This course will introduce several important figures in this Jewish Sufi movement, from Bahya ibn Paquda in 11th-century Spain to Maimonides and his descendants in 12th-14th century Egypt. There will be a section for Arabists to read Bahya's "Duties of the Hearts" in Arabic, and a section for Hebraists to read the twelfth-century Hebrew translation of it.

Ident. HIJD 48610

 ISLM 32400 Shi'ism: History, Memory, Politics

Doostdar, Alireza

W 1:30-4:20 S208

This course is an introduction to Shi'ism as an alternative interpretation of Islam shaped around the figure of Ali and the family of Muhammad. We will attend particularly to the crisis of succession after Muhammad's death, the trauma of the Karbala massacre, debates in Twelver Shi'i theology and law, and various early modern and modern transformations in Shi'i communities in Iran, Iraq, and Lebanon.

HIJD 36912 Septuagint Greek

Torallas, Sofia

T/Th 9:00-10:20 CL 021

This course is aimed at students who have a working knowledge of Greek Grammar. The course will provide an overview of both the linguistic aspects of the language of the Greek Old Testament, and the social and literary context within which the text was produced. We will cover text-critical questions; the general phenomenon of "translation Greek" and the specific processes of translation of the LXX; subsequent translations of the text; textual transmission from the papyrus codex to the medieval witnesses; particularities of the Greek language in Egypt; and the history of the society that produced the translation, the Jewish community of Alexandria. Close reading will focus on the Pentateuch, with select passages from other books.

Ident. BIBL 36912, HCHR 36912, CLAS 36912

HIJD 37212 Jews and Christians in Egypt

Torallas, Sofia

T/Th 1:30-2:50 CL 021

This course will be taught with texts in translation and does not require any knowledge of Greek. It will begin by covering the history of the Jews in Egypt from the earliest Elephantine garrison to the scarce evidence for their survival beyond the reign of Hadrian. Drawing on literary and documentary texts from the Ptolemaic and Roman periods, we will approach topics such as political representation, legal issues, animal sacrifice and onomastics and identity. We will then turn to the earliest stage of Christianity in Egypt, with special focus on the birth of monasticism, again drawing on literary and documentary texts.

Ident. BIBL 37212/HCHR 37212, CLAS 37212

HIJD 38701 Poetic Theologies of Light

Fishbane, Michael

TH 9:00-11:50 S403

This course will examine the imagery, symbolism and role of light in Jewish religious poetry -- beginning with its biblical foundations, the religious-liturgical poetry of late antiquity and the medieval period, and modern spiritual meditations and romantic nostalgia. In addition to some selected Psalms, authors like Killir, ibn Gabirol, Judah Halevi, Abraham Kook , and H. N. Bialik will be considered. Theoretical works on the metaphor of light in world religions will be discussed, and various comparisons with (Christian) Patristic and (Islamic) Sufi poetry will be introduced.

No language requirement. Original Hebrew (and other) sources will be distributed along with English translations.

HIJD 39401 Love in Jewish Thought and Spirituality

Fishbane,Michael

W 1:30-4:20 S200

This course will study the 'Tract of Love' in Elijah de Vidas' 16th century masterwork (Reshit Hokhmah –The Beginning of Wisdom). De Vidas was a member of the spiritual devotionals in the Safed mystical community. His encyclopedic work gives profound expression to the role of love (culled from the totality of Jewish tradition) in cultivating a spiritual personality. Emphasis will be placed on the content and phenomenology of the material, and its role in shaping the religious life. We shall also look at some other contemporary Jewish (like Azikri) and Christian (like St. John of the Cross) authors on this theme.

No language requirement. Original Hebrew (and other) sources will be distributed along with English translations.

HIJD 41002 Major Issues in the Study of Jewish Mysticism: Between Kabbalah and Hasidism

Elior, Rachel

M 9:00-11:50 S403

The course will explore various intriguing aspects of Hasidism in relation to the Kabbalah of the 16th Century and the messianic mystical teachings of the Sabbatians of the 17th-18th Centuries. The relations between the unlimited freedom of mystical imagination and its central role in shaping communal religious experience in harsh historical circumstances, will be discussed. Mystical testimonies of Kabbalistic writers and Hasidic teachers will be studied, in English translation, as expressions of Jewish intellectual history, controversial religious thought and socio-historical innovation of the Jewish traditional community .

HIJD 47110 Ibn Tufayl's Hayy b. Yaqzan

Robinson, James

M 1:30-4:20 S403

A study of Ibn Tufayl's classic twelfth-century philosophical/mystical romance, the story of a boy spontaneously generated on a desert island who achieves knowledge of God through empirical study of nature. There will be a section for Arabists to read the text in Arabic, and a section for Hebraists to read the medieval Hebrew translation with Moses Narboni's unpublished commentary on it.

Ident. ISLM 47110

HIJD 48610 Jewish Sufism

Robinson, James

Th 1:30-4:20 S400

During the Middle Ages the Jews in the Muslim world developed a robust synthesis of Jewish Spirituality and Islamic Sufism. Even those who did not subscribe to a Sufi pietistic Judaism nevertheless introduced Sufi language and ideas into their Jewish thought. This course will introduce several important figures in this Jewish Sufi movement, from Bahya ibn Paquda in 11th-century Spain to Maimonides and his descendants in 12th-14th century Egypt. There will be a section for Arabists to read Bahya's "Duties of the Hearts" in Arabic, and a section for Hebraists to read the twelfth-century Hebrew translation of it.

Ident. ISLM 48610

HCHR 30900 History of Christian Thought 5

Hector, Kevin

T/TH 1:30-2:50 S106

This course traces the history of Modern Christian thought from Kant, Schleiermacher, and Hegel through Troeltsch and Barth.

Ident. THEO 30700

HCHR 36912 Septuagint Greek

Torallas, Sofia

ARR

This course is aimed at students who have a working knowledge of Greek Grammar. The course will provide an overview of both the linguistic aspects of the language of the Greek Old Testament, and the social and literary context within which the text was produced. We will cover text-critical questions; the general phenomenon of "translation Greek" and the specific processes of translation of the LXX; subsequent translations of the text; textual transmission from the papyrus codex to the medieval witnesses; particularities of the Greek language in Egypt; and the history of the society that produced the translation, the Jewish community of Alexandria. Close reading will focus on the Pentateuch, with select passages from other books.

Ident. BIBL 36912, HIJD 36912, CLAS 36912

HCHR 37212 Jews and Christians in Egypt

Torallas, Sofia

ARR

This course will be taught with texts in translation and does not require any knowledge of Greek. It will begin by covering the history of the Jews in Egypt from the earliest Elephantine garrison to the scarce evidence for their survival beyond the reign of Hadrian. Drawing on literary and documentary texts from the Ptolemaic and Roman periods, we will approach topics such as political representation, legal issues, animal sacrifice and onomastics and identity. We will then turn to the earliest stage of Christianity in Egypt, with special focus on the birth of monasticism, again drawing on literary and documentary texts.

Ident. BIBL 37212/HIJD 37212, CLAS 37212

HCHR 41700 Calvin's Institutes

Schreiner, Susan

T/TH 3:00-4:20 S208

Ident. THEO 41300

HCHR 42700 Revising the American Religious Historical Canon

Brekus, Catherine

T 1:30-4:20 S201

This course examines recent trends in the writing of American religious history. Since the 1970s, American religious historians have argued that the "canon" needs to be revised. By reading some of the most influential articles and books in the field, we will critically assess both the strengths and weaknesses of the "new" history. Besides reading textbooks such as Catherine Albanese's America: Religion and Religionsand George Marsden's Religion and American Culture, we will read case studies of new approaches and methodologies. Students are required to make a class presentation and to write a final 20-25 page paper.

PQ: Enrollment is strictly limited to students who have taken "The American Religious Historical Canon"

Ident. RAME 42700/HIST 63800

HCHR 46210 Diversa, sed non adverse: Religious Trends and Themes in the 12th Century

Otten, Willemien

M/W 10:00-11:20 S200

The twelfth century is traditionally known as a period of cultural renewal, a renaissance. In recent years there has been much more interest in the diversity and complexity of twelfth century developments: it is a period of schools and monasteries, of a vigorous debate between moderns (moderni) and ancients (antiqui), of religious change and new spiritualities, but also of a kind of melancholy, a criticism of learning, and of the first cracks in the convergence of theology and philosophy. The course will identify certain trends and themes and explore those through selected readings. Among the authors covered will be Peter Abelard, Bernard of Clairvaux, Hugh of St. Victor, Hildegard of Bingen, William of St. Thierry, and Alan of Lille.

Ident. THEO 46210

HCHR 48801 The Multidisciplinary Study of America Culture

Slauter, Eric

T 9:00-11:50 R 405

This seminar surveys the study of America culture as it is currently practiced at the University of Chicago. Seminar members read and discuss recent work in anthropology, cinema and media studies, economics, history, law, literature, music, and political science with faculty specialists from the Humanities, the Social Sciences, the Divinity School, and the Law School at Chicago. Though interested in how different disciplines frame questions and problems, we will be attuned to convergences in themes, approaches, and methods. During the last half of our Tuesday seminar meetings our authors will join us for a focused discussion of their work. This year many guests of the Scherer Center Seminar will also deliver public lectures on Wednesdays at 4:30pm.

Ident. RLIT 48801/AMER 50001/ENGL 55405/HIST 62304

HCHR 51310 Uncle Tom's Cabin, or Life Among the Lowly: Its Lives and Afterlives

Brekus, Catherine/Rosengarten, Richard

Th 1:30-4:20 S201

This seminar will engage in intensive reflection on Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel in both its immediate, pre-Civil War context and in its subsequent renditions and valorizations. Our central question will be the relation of historical significance and importance to aesthetic value: much of what was made of the novel, both by contemporaries and in later periods, pivots on different assessments of each, and indeed on the relation of them as tandem considerations in evaluating the novel.

Ident. RLIT 51310

HCHR 51510 Seminar: Idolatry: Historical and Modern Perspectives

Schreiner, Susan

M 1:00-3:50 S200

This seminar examines the concept of idolatry as formulated in the Reformation disputes. We will analyze the way idolatry was understood by Luther, Calvin and Zwingli. We will also look at the occurrences of iconoclasm and religious violence in the 16th century; at the development of the concept of the modern ideas of idolatry, partly as a legacy of Francis Bacon; and at the view of idolatry in Karl Barth, Jacques Ellul and Nicholas Lash.

Ident. THEO 51510

RAME 42700 Revising the American Religious Historical Canon

Brekus, Catherine

T 1:30-4:20 S201

This course examines recent trends in the writing of American religious history. Since the 1970s, American religious historians have argued that the "canon" needs to be revised. By reading some of the most influential articles and books in the field, we will critically assess both the strengths and weaknesses of the "new" history. Besides reading textbooks such as Catherine Albanese's America: Religion and Religionsand George Marsden's Religion and American Culture, we will read case studies of new approaches and methodologies. Students are required to make a class presentation and to write a final 20-25 page paper.

PQ: Enrollment is strictly limited to students who have taken "The American religious Historical Canon"

Ident. HCHR 42700/HIST 63800

HREL 30300 Indian Philosophy 2

Arnold, Dan

T/TH 10:30-11:50 S400

Ident. DVPR 30302/RLST 24202/SALC 20902/30902

HREL 42100 Religion and Society in Pre-Christian Europe

Lincoln, Bruce

M/W 3:00-4:20 S400

HREL 43210 Nuer Religion

Lincoln, Bruce

M/W 9:00-10:20 S201

Ident. ANTH 42505

HREL 43310 Against the Gods: Comparative Perspectives on Human Resistance to the Higher Powers

Doniger, Wendy/Daston, Lorraine

Th 1:30-4:20 S200

Outright atheism is only one form of human resistance to what gods there be –and probably the one that bears the closest resemblance to the religion that it denies. As tales of disobedience (Adam and Eve [in Genesis and in Milton], the rebel angels), defiance (Prometheus, Abraham, Lucifer, the Bengali merchant Chando versus the goddess Manasa), disdain (early Buddhists, some South Indian worshippers, Kabir), and hubris (Phaeton, Faust) suggest, even those who believe firmly in the existence of deities sometimes argue with, mutiny against, or usurp them. Resistance can be philosophical, as in Epicurean attempts to minimize the role of the gods in human affairs, or scientific, as in experiments that rival divine powers to create life or unleash Armageddon. It can also be moral, a complaint lodged against divine injustice. This seminar surveys the recurring motif of human insubordination to divine edict in the context of both Western and Eastern mythologies, literature, science, philosophy, and art.

Note: Undergraduates and Graduates Admitted by Permission of the Instructors.

Ident. SCTH

HREL 52200 Problems in the History of Religions

Doniger, Wendy

T 7:00-10:00 ARR

PQ: Limited to students in the Ph.D. program in the History of Religions working on their colloquium paper, orals statement for the Qualifying Examinations, or dissertation chapter.

RLIT 30406 Jewish Thought and Literature III: Biblical Voices in Modern Hebrew Literature

Na'ama Rokem

ARR

The Hebrew Bible is the most important intertextual point of reference in Modern Hebrew literature, a literary tradition that begins with the (sometimes contested) claim to revive the ancient language of the Bible. In this course, we will consider the Bible as a source of vocabulary, figurative language, voice and narrative models in modern Hebrew and Jewish literature, considering the stakes and the implications of such intertextual engagement. Among the topics we will focus on: the concept of language-revival, the figure of the prophet-poet, revisions and counter-versions of key Biblical stories (including the story of creation, the binding of Isaac and the stories of King David), the Song of Songs in Modern Jewish poetry

Ident.NEHC 30406/CMLT 30401

RLIT 34400 Modern Rewritings of the Gospel Narratives

Solovieva, Olga

M/W 1:30-2:50 ARR

This interdisciplinary course focuses on the literary dimension of the gospels and on their artistic reception in modern culture. Starting from a presentation of narrative theory, it asks whether religious and secular narratives differ in structure, and illuminates narrative conventions of different media and genres. Both thematic aspects (what aspect of the gospels are selected for development in modern adaptations?) and features of presentation (how do different media and styles transform similar content?) will be considered. Principal works include Johann Sebastian Bach "The Passion According to St. Mathew" (1720); Ernest Renan, "The Life of Jesus" (1865); Nikos Kazantzakis, "The Last Temptation of Christ" (1955); Pasolini, "The Gospel According to Matthew" (1964); Jose Saramago, "The Gospel According to Jesus Christ" (1991); Norman Mailer, "The Gospel According to the Son" (1997); and Monty Python "Life of Brian" (1979). Secondary readings include Mieke Bal, "Narratology," and Bultmann, "History of the Synoptic Tradition."

Ident. CMLT 34409/RLST 28809/GRMN 34415

RLIT 36600 Bruno/Campanella

Maggi, Armando

M/W 1:30-2:50 Wb 207

This course analyzes the philosophy and theology of Giordano Bruno and Tommaso Campanella, two crucial figures of European 16th century culture. As philosophers, theologians, poets and narrators, Bruno and Campanella embody the literary, religions, and philosophical syncretism of the Italian
Rennai ssance. To study these authors necessarily entails a close analysis of Florentine Neo-Platonism, Hermetism, magic, and apocalyptism, along with the literary traditions that molded the Italian renaissance. We discuss Bruno's Italian Dialogues, De umbris idearum (his first major treatise on artificial memory), and a selection of his later Latin poems. We then examine Campanella's La Citta del sole, most of his philosophical poems, De Antichristo, and a selection of his theological treatises. Classes conducted in English. Texts in English and the original.

Ident. ITAL 36600

RLIT 40300 Islamic Love Poetry

Sells, Michael

Tu 1:30-4:20 MMC Library

The focus is on the pre-modern Islamic love lyric (nasib, ghazal). Since none of us know all the relevant languages, I ask each participant in the course to be a guide for a tradition for which he or she knows the language. We almost always devote sections to Arabic, Persian, Ottoman, and Urdu love lyric, and in the past, depending on the background and skills of the participants, we have read Bengali, Punjabi, Turkish, and Hindi poems. Other languages are possibility as well.
Prerequisite: ability to work in one of Islamicate languages, such as those mentioned above or an equivalent.

Ident. ISLM 40100/NEHC 40600/CMLT 40100

RLIT 42710 Late Antique Art

Elsner, Jas

M/W 1:30-4:20 CWAC 152

This course, inspired by and focusing on the materials in the Late Antique show at the Art Institute, will be an introduction to Late Antique art. It will explore the significance of the changes in visual production in the genesis of the general theoretical bibliography of art history; the particular characteristics of late antique art and the range of its kinds of artifacts; its specific and conflictive historiography. We shall veer between an empirical inductive approach, looking at lots of stuff in the museum and a more general account of theoretical overviews that have been offered for Late Roman art overviews that have been influential in the broader historiography of art history as a discipline. The course will be taught over the first 5 weeks of the Spring Quarter on an intensive (let us hope not an excessively intensive) schedule.

IDENT ARTZH 42700

RLIT 48801 The Multidisciplinary Study of America Culture

Slauter, Eric

T 9:00-11:50 R 405

This seminar surveys the study of America culture as it is currently practiced at the University of Chicago. Seminar members read and discuss recent work in anthropology, cinema and media studies, economics, history, law, literature, music, and political science with faculty specialists from the Humanities, the Social Sciences, the Divinity School, and the Law School at Chicago. Though interested in how different disciplines frame questions and problems, we will be attuned to convergences in themes, approaches, and methods. During the last half of our Tuesday seminar meetings our authors will join us for a focused discussion of their work. This year many guests of the Scherer Center Seminar will also deliver public lectures on Wednesdays at 4:30pm.

Ident. HCHR 48801/AMER 50001/ENGL 55405/HIST 62304

RLIT 51310 Uncle Tom's Cabin, or Life Among the Lowly: Its Lives and Afterlives

Rosengarten, Richard/Brekus, Catherine

Th 1:30-4:20 S201

This seminar will engage in intensive reflection on Harriet Beecher Stowe's novel in both its immediate, pre-Civil War context and in its subsequent renditions and valorizations. Our central question will be the relation of historical significance and importance to aesthetic value: much of what was made of the novel, both by contemporaries and in later periods, pivots on different assessments of each, and indeed on the relation of them as tandem considerations in evaluating the novel.

Ident. HCHR 51310

RETH 31200 History of Theological Ethics ll

Schweiker, William

T/TH 10:30-11:50 S106

This is the second part of a two part history. It is conducted through the study of basic, classic texts. The course begins with the tumultuous period of the Reformation and the Renaissance arising from the so-called Middle Ages and so attention to rebirth of classical thought, the plight of women in the medieval world, the interactions among Jews, Christians and Muslims, and the rise of cities and even nations. The course then moves into the emergence of distinctly "modern" forms of ethics in the "Enlightenment," through the romantic period and to the political, economic, and religious crises of the 20th century. The history ends with the emergence in the global field of the power interaction of the religions. While the golden thread of the history is the development and differentiation of Christian moral thinking, this is set within and compared with the complexity of traditions (philosophical, Jewish, Islamic) that intersect and often collide through centuries in Western thought. In this way, the exploration of one tradition opens onto rich comparative thinking. The course proceeds by lectures and discussion. Most readings are in translation. There will be a final examination. This is a basic course and thus no previous work in theology, philosophy, or ethics is required.

Ident. THEO 31200

RETH 41000 Feminist Philosophy

Nussbaum, Martha

M/W/Th 1:30-2:30

The course is an introduction to the major varieties of philosophical feminism: Liberal Feminism (Mill, Wollstonecraft, Okin, Nussbaum), Radical Feminism (MacKinnon, Andrea Dworkin), Difference Feminism (Gilligan, Held, Noddings), and Postmodern "Queer" Feminism (Rubin, Butler). After studying each of these approaches, we will focus on political and ethical problems of contemporary international feminism, asking how well each of the approaches addresses these problems.

Ident. PHIL 31900/LAWS 47701/PLSC 51900/HMRT 31900/GNSE 29600

RETH 45401 Theories of Medical Ethics

Sulmasy, Daniel

T 6:00-8:50 S208

Open to Divinity, Law, and Medical students, this seminar will involve a close reading and critique of the most prominent theories in contemporary medical ethics, including Principlism (Beauchamp and Childress), Utilitarianism (Singer; Epstein), Libertarianism (Engelhardt), Contractualism (Veatch), Foundationalism (Pellegrino and Thomasma), Casuistry (Jonsen and Toulmin), and Covenantal approaches (Ramsey; May). The class will be conducted in classical seminar style, with students assigned to lead the discussions of particular texts. Our interdisciplinary discussion will exemplify and provide a context for the interdisciplinary nature of the field.

Ident. LAWS 80403

RETH 45903 Christian and Anti-Christian: Kierkegaard and Nietzsche on Religion and Morality

Schweiker, William

T/TH 1:30-2:50 S208

This course explores major writings of Kierkegaard and Nietzsche on the relation between religion and morality. No previous knowledge or work in theology or ethics required. Course limited to 15 students.

Course will incude a close reading and discvussion of the texts. Requirement include a final paper.

Ident. THEO 45903

RETH 50202 Religion and the Political Order: II

Elshtain, Jean

M 1:00-3:50 S208

Ident. PLSC 50202